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Implicitly Constrained Semi-Supervised Least Squares Classification

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We introduce a novel semi-supervised version of the least squares classifier. This implicitly constrained least squares (ICLS) classifier minimizes the squared loss on the labeled data among the set of parameters implied by all possible labelings of the unlabeled data. Unlike other discriminative semi-supervised methods, our approach does not introduce explicit additional assumptions into the objective function, but leverages implicit assumptions already present in the choice of the supervised least squares classifier. We show this approach can be formulated as a quadratic programming problem and its solution can be found using a simple gradient descent procedure. We prove that, in a certain way, our method never leads to performance worse than the supervised classifier. Experimental results corroborate this theoretical result in the multidimensional case on benchmark datasets, also in terms of the error rate.


On Semi-Supervised Classification

Neural Information Processing Systems

A graph-based prior is proposed for parametric semi-supervised Classification. The prior utilizes both labelled and unlabelled data; it also integrates features from multiple Views of a given sample (e.g., multiple


Robust Semi-supervised Least Squares Classification by Implicit Constraints

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We introduce the implicitly constrained least squares (ICLS) classifier, a novel semi-supervised version of the least squares classifier. This classifier minimizes the squared loss on the labeled data among the set of parameters implied by all possible labelings of the unlabeled data. Unlike other discriminative semi-supervised methods, this approach does not introduce explicit additional assumptions into the objective function, but leverages implicit assumptions already present in the choice of the supervised least squares classifier. This method can be formulated as a quadratic programming problem and its solution can be found using a simple gradient descent procedure. We prove that, in a limited 1-dimensional setting, this approach never leads to performance worse than the supervised classifier. Experimental results show that also in the general multidimensional case performance improvements can be expected, both in terms of the squared loss that is intrinsic to the classifier, as well as in terms of the expected classification error.


Weakly Supervised Classification in High Energy Physics

arXiv.org Machine Learning

As machine learning algorithms become increasingly sophisticated to exploit subtle features of the data, they often become more dependent on simulations. This paper presents a new approach called weakly supervised classification in which class proportions are the only input into the machine learning algorithm. Using one of the most challenging binary classification tasks in high energy physics - quark versus gluon tagging - we show that weakly supervised classification can match the performance of fully supervised algorithms. Furthermore, by design, the new algorithm is insensitive to any mis-modeling of discriminating features in the data by the simulation. Weakly supervised classification is a general procedure that can be applied to a wide variety of learning problems to boost performance and robustness when detailed simulations are not reliable or not available.


Projected Estimators for Robust Semi-supervised Classification

arXiv.org Machine Learning

For semi-supervised techniques to be applied safely in practice we at least want methods to outperform their supervised counterparts. We study this question for classification using the well-known quadratic surrogate loss function. Using a projection of the supervised estimate onto a set of constraints imposed by the unlabeled data, we find we can safely improve over the supervised solution in terms of this quadratic loss. Unlike other approaches to semi-supervised learning, the procedure does not rely on assumptions that are not intrinsic to the classifier at hand. It is theoretically demonstrated that, measured on the labeled and unlabeled training data, this semi-supervised procedure never gives a lower quadratic loss than the supervised alternative. To our knowledge this is the first approach that offers such strong, albeit conservative, guarantees for improvement over the supervised solution. The characteristics of our approach are explicated using benchmark datasets to further understand the similarities and differences between the quadratic loss criterion used in the theoretical results and the classification accuracy often considered in practice.