Aira uses smart glasses to help blind people navigate the world

Engadget

Aira is designed to make life a little easier for blind and visually impaired people. Using a pair of smart glasses or a phone camera, the system allows an Aira agent to see what the blind person sees in real-time, and then talk them through whatever situation they're in. Aira promises to make everything from grocery shopping, calling an Uber or world travel more accessible for blind people across the globe. Aira doesn't replace existing assistance systems. Instead, it's designed to enhance them.


Virtual reality walking stick tutors blind people to cross roads

New Scientist

You no longer need to be able to see to enjoy virtual reality. A walking cane that simulates the feeling of real objects is letting people who are blind explore digital simulations.


Blind Grocery Shoppers Access 'Second Set Of Eyes' Through App At Wegmans

NPR Technology

Gary Wagner, a blind Buffalo resident and subscriber to an app that connects him to a shopping assistant, looks for hot sauce at a Wegmans store in Amherst, New York. Gary Wagner, a blind Buffalo resident and subscriber to an app that connects him to a shopping assistant, looks for hot sauce at a Wegmans store in Amherst, New York. When you're blind, it can be hard to do things on your own that sighted people take for granted. This includes picking your seat on an airplane, matching your socks, or finding a specific brand of cereal on a grocery store shelf stocked with dozens of selections. An app service known as Aira offers blind and visually impaired users the opportunity to use their smartphones as a second set of eyes.


AR technology helps the blind navigate by making objects 'talk'

Engadget

If you're blind, finding your way through a new area can sometimes be challenging. In the future, though, you might just need to wear a headset. Caltech researchers have developed a Cognitive Augmented Reality Assistant (CARA) that uses Microsoft's HoloLens to make objects "talk" to you. CARA uses computer vision to identify objects in a given space and say their names -- thanks to spatialized sound, you'll know if there's a chair in front of you or a door to your right. The closer you are, the higher the pitch of an object's voice.


Self-Organization based on Coordinated Actions of Autonomous Agents Satoshi KURIHARA and Michio OKADA

AAAI Conferences

This paper shows study on mechanism for selforganization. A global order is organized by simple and locally coordiztnted actions of autonomous a ents uldns only very local information, and not by their complex and globally coordinated actions which would use global me sse pas-ng and high level strategies. The fundamental factors for establizhing the global order by self-orSuizztion are "dimdpztive structure nnd "zutocztMytic mechanisms. If an environment where agents exist hun dissipative structure and those a4enta hnve some sort of autocatalytic mechanisms within themselves, it is possible to form a global order of nsent8 by their simple and locally coordinated actions. "Blind Hunger Dilemma (Num okL 1994)" is used an example tO dmul&te the self-orsmsisation and coordinated actions of agents and to show the validity of our approach.