Goto

Collaborating Authors

Active Learning for Probabilistic Hypotheses Using the Maximum Gibbs Error Criterion

Neural Information Processing Systems

We introduce a new objective function for pool-based Bayesian active learning with probabilistic hypotheses. This objective function, called the policy Gibbs error, is the expected error rate of a random classifier drawn from the prior distribution on the examples adaptively selected by the active learning policy. Exact maximization of the policy Gibbs error is hard, so we propose a greedy strategy that maximizes the Gibbs error at each iteration, where the Gibbs error on an instance is the expected error of a random classifier selected from the posterior label distribution on that instance. We apply this maximum Gibbs error criterion to three active learning scenarios: non-adaptive, adaptive, and batch active learning. In each scenario, we prove that the criterion achieves near-maximal policy Gibbs error when constrained to a fixed budget. For practical implementations, we provide approximations to the maximum Gibbs error criterion for Bayesian conditional random fields and transductive Naive Bayes. Our experimental results on a named entity recognition task and a text classification task show that the maximum Gibbs error criterion is an effective active learning criterion for noisy models.


Robustness of Bayesian Pool-based Active Learning Against Prior Misspecification

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We study the robustness of active learning (AL) algorithms against prior misspecification: whether an algorithm achieves similar performance using a perturbed prior as compared to using the true prior. In both the average and worst cases of the maximum coverage setting, we prove that all $\alpha$-approximate algorithms are robust (i.e., near $\alpha$-approximate) if the utility is Lipschitz continuous in the prior. We further show that robustness may not be achieved if the utility is non-Lipschitz. This suggests we should use a Lipschitz utility for AL if robustness is required. For the minimum cost setting, we can also obtain a robustness result for approximate AL algorithms. Our results imply that many commonly used AL algorithms are robust against perturbed priors. We then propose the use of a mixture prior to alleviate the problem of prior misspecification. We analyze the robustness of the uniform mixture prior and show experimentally that it performs reasonably well in practice.


Robustness of Bayesian Pool-Based Active Learning Against Prior Misspecification

AAAI Conferences

We study the robustness of active learning (AL) algorithms against prior misspecification: whether an algorithm achieves similar performance using a perturbed prior as compared to using the true prior. In both the average and worst cases of the maximum coverage setting, we prove that all alpha-approximate algorithms are robust (i.e., near alpha-approximate) if the utility is Lipschitz continuous in the prior. We further show that robustness may not be achieved if the utility is non-Lipschitz. This suggests we should use a Lipschitz utility for AL if robustness is required. For the minimum cost setting, we can also obtain a robustness result for approximate AL algorithms. Our results imply that many commonly used AL algorithms are robust against perturbed priors. We then propose the use of a mixture prior to alleviate the problem of prior misspecification. We analyze the robustness of the uniform mixture prior and show experimentally that it performs reasonably well in practice.


Bayesian Active Learning With Abstention Feedbacks

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We study pool-based active learning with abstention feedbacks where a labeler can abstain from labeling a queried example with some unknown abstention rate. Using the Bayesian approach, we develop two new greedy algorithms that learn both the classification problem and the unknown abstention rate at the same time. These are achieved by incorporating the estimated average abstention rate into the greedy criteria. We prove that both algorithms have near-optimality guarantees: they respectively achieve a ${(1-\frac{1}{e})}$ constant factor approximation of the optimal expected or worst-case value of a useful utility function. Our experiments show the algorithms perform well in various practical scenarios.


Adaptive Stochastic Optimization: From Sets to Paths

Neural Information Processing Systems

Adaptive stochastic optimization optimizes an objective function adaptively under uncertainty. Adaptive stochastic optimization plays a crucial role in planning and learning under uncertainty, but is, unfortunately, computationally intractable in general. This paper introduces two conditions on the objective function, the marginal likelihood rate bound and the marginal likelihood bound, which enable efficient approximate solution of adaptive stochastic optimization. Several interesting classes of functions satisfy these conditions naturally, e.g., the version space reduction function for hypothesis learning. We describe Recursive Adaptive Coverage (RAC), a new adaptive stochastic optimization algorithm that exploits these conditions, and apply it to two planning tasks under uncertainty. In constrast to the earlier submodular optimization approach, our algorithm applies to adaptive stochastic optimization algorithm over both sets and paths.