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An Algorithmic Framework for Computing Validation Performance Bounds by Using Suboptimal Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Practical model building processes are often time-consuming because many different models must be trained and validated. In this paper, we introduce a novel algorithm that can be used for computing the lower and the upper bounds of model validation errors without actually training the model itself. A key idea behind our algorithm is using a side information available from a suboptimal model. If a reasonably good suboptimal model is available, our algorithm can compute lower and upper bounds of many useful quantities for making inferences on the unknown target model. We demonstrate the advantage of our algorithm in the context of model selection for regularized learning problems.



Tighter bounds lead to improved classifiers

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The standard approach to supervised classification involves the minimization of a log-loss as an upper bound to the classification error. While this is a tight bound early on in the optimization, it overemphasizes the influence of incorrectly classified examples far from the decision boundary. Updating the upper bound during the optimization leads to improved classification rates while transforming the learning into a sequence of minimization problems. In addition, in the context where the classifier is part of a larger system, this modification makes it possible to link the performance of the classifier to that of the whole system, allowing the seamless introduction of external constraints.


An Error Detection and Correction Framework for Connectomics

Neural Information Processing Systems

We define and study error detection and correction tasks that are useful for 3D reconstruction of neurons from electron microscopic imagery, and for image segmentation more generally. Both tasks take as input the raw image and a binary mask representing a candidate object. For the error detection task, the desired output is a map of split and merge errors in the object. For the error correction task, the desired output is the true object. We call this object mask pruning, because the candidate object mask is assumed to be a superset of the true object. We train multiscale 3D convolutional networks to perform both tasks. We find that the error-detecting net can achieve high accuracy. The accuracy of the error-correcting net is enhanced if its input object mask is ``advice'' (union of erroneous objects) from the error-detecting net.


Reducing Runtime by Recycling Samples

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Contrary to the situation with stochastic gradient descent, we argue that when using stochastic methods with variance reduction, such as SDCA, SAG or SVRG, as well as their variants, it could be beneficial to reuse previously used samples instead of fresh samples, even when fresh samples are available. We demonstrate this empirically for SDCA, SAG and SVRG, studying the optimal sample size one should use, and also uncover be-havior that suggests running SDCA for an integer number of epochs could be wasteful.