SUIT: A Supervised User-Item Based Topic Model for Sentiment Analysis

AAAI Conferences

Probabilistic topic models have been widely used for sentiment analysis. However, most of existing topic methods only model the sentiment text, but do not consider the user, who expresses the sentiment, and the item, which the sentiment is expressed on. Since different users may use different sentiment expressions for different items, we argue that it is better to incorporate the user and item information into the topic model for sentiment analysis. In this paper, we propose a new Supervised User-Item based Topic model, called SUIT model, for sentiment analysis. It can simultaneously utilize the textual topic and latent user-item factors. Our proposed method uses the tensor outer product of text topic proportion vector, user latent factor and item latent factor to model the sentiment label generalization. Extensive experiments are conducted on two datasets: review dataset and microblog dataset. The results demonstrate the advantages of our model. It shows significant improvement compared with supervised topic models and collaborative filtering methods.


A Hierarchical Aspect-Sentiment Model for Online Reviews

AAAI Conferences

To help users quickly understand the major opinions from massive online reviews, it is important to automatically reveal the latent structure of the aspects, sentiment polarities, and the association between them. However, there is little work available to do this effectively. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical aspect sentiment model (HASM) to discover a hierarchical structure of aspect-based sentiments from unlabeled online reviews. In HASM, the whole structure is a tree. Each node itself is a two-level tree, whose root represents an aspect and the children represent the sentiment polarities associated with it. Each aspect or sentiment polarity is modeled as a distribution of words. To automatically extract both the structure and parameters of the tree, we use a Bayesian nonparametric model, recursive Chinese Restaurant Process (rCRP), as the prior and jointly infer the aspect-sentiment tree from the review texts. Experiments on two real datasets show that our model is comparable to two other hierarchical topic models in terms of quantitative measures of topic trees. It is also shown that our model achieves better sentence-level classification accuracy than previously proposed aspect-sentiment joint models.


Modeling Polarizing Topics: When Do Different Political Communities Respond Differently to the Same News?

AAAI Conferences

Political discourse in the United States is getting increasingly polarized. This polarization frequently causes different communities to react very differently to the same news events. Political blogs as a form of social media provide an unique insight into this phenomenon. We present a multitarget, semisupervised latent variable model, MCR-LDA to model this process by analyzing political blogs posts and their comment sections from different political communities jointly to predict the degree of polarization that news topics cause. Inspecting the model after inference reveals topics and the degree to which it triggers polarization. In this approach, community responses to news topics are observed using sentiment polarity and comment volume which serves as a proxy for the level of interest in the topic. In this context, we also present computational methods to assign sentiment polarity to the comments which serve as targets for latent variable models that predict the polarity based on the topics in the blog content. Our results show that the joint modeling of communities with different political beliefs using MCR-LDA does not sacrifice accuracy in sentiment polarity prediction when compared to approaches that are tailored to specific communities and additionally provides a view of the polarization in responses from the different communities.


Sentiment-Based Topic Suggestion for Micro-Reviews

AAAI Conferences

Location-based social sites, such as Foursquare or Yelp, are gaining increasing popularity. These sites allow users to check in at venues and leave a short commentary in the form of a micro-review. Micro-reviews are rich in content as they offer a distilled and concise account of user experience. In this paper we consider the problem of predicting the topic of a micro-review by a user who visits a new venue. Such a prediction can help users make informed decisions, and also help venue owners personalize users’ experiences. However, topic modeling for micro-reviews is particularly difficult, due to their short and fragmented nature. We address this issue using pooling strategies, which aggregate micro-reviews at the venue or user level, and we propose novel probabilistic models based on Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) for extracting the topics related to a user-venue pair. Our best topic model integrates influences from both venue inherent properties and user preferences, considering at the same the sentiment orientation of the users. Experimental results on real datasets demonstrate the superiority of this model compared to simpler models and previous work; they also show that venue-inherent properties have higher influences on the topics of micro-reviews.


Tracking Sentiment and Topic Dynamics from Social Media

AAAI Conferences

We propose a dynamic joint sentiment-topic model (dJST) which allows the detection and tracking of views of current and recurrent interests and shifts in topic and sentiment. Both topic and sentiment dynamics are captured by assuming that the current sentiment-topic specific word distributions are generated according to the word distributions at previous epochs. We derive efficient online inference procedures to sequentially update the model with newly arrived data and show the effectiveness of our proposed model on the Mozilla add-on reviews crawled between 2007 and 2011.