Co-Training Based Bilingual Sentiment Lexicon Learning

AAAI Conferences

In this paper, we address the issue of bilingual sentiment lexicon learning(BSLL) which aims to automatically and simultaneously generate sentiment words for two languages. The underlying motivation is that sentiment information from two languages can perform iterative mutual-teaching in the learning procedure. We propose to develop two classifiers to determine the sentiment polarities of words under a co-training framework, which makes full use of the two-view sentiment information from the two languages. The word alignment derived from the parallel corpus is leveraged to design effective features and to bridge the learning of the two classifiers. The experimental results on English and Chinese languages show the effectiveness of our approach in BSLL.


How Translation Alters Sentiment

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Sentiment analysis research has predominantly been on English texts. Thus there exist many sentiment resources for English, but less so for other languages. Approaches to improve sentiment analysis in a resource-poor focus language include: (a) translate the focus language text into a resource-rich language such as English, and apply a powerful English sentiment analysis system on the text, and (b) translate resources such as sentiment labeled corpora and sentiment lexicons from English into the focus language, and use them as additional resources in the focus-language sentiment analysis system. In this paper we systematically examine both options. We use Arabic social media posts as stand-in for the focus language text. We show that sentiment analysis of English translations of Arabic texts produces competitive results, w.r.t.


SocialSent: Domain-Specific Sentiment Lexicons

@machinelearnbot

The word soft may evoke positive connotations of warmth and cuddliness in many contexts, but calling a hockey player soft would be an insult. If you were to say something was terrific in the 1800s, this would probably imply that it was terrifying and awe-inspiring; today, terrific basically just implies that something is (pretty) good.


Expanding Domain Sentiment Lexicon through Double Propagation

AAAI Conferences

In most sentiment analysis applications, the sentiment lexicon plays a key role. However, it is hard, if not impossible, to collect and maintain a universal sentiment lexicon for all application domains because different words may be used in different domains. The main existing technique extracts such sentiment words from a large domain corpus based on different conjunctions and the idea of sentiment coherency in a sentence. In this paper, we propose a novel propagation approach that exploits the relations between sentiment words and topics or product features that the sentiment words modify, and also sentiment words and product features themselves to extract new sentiment words. As the method propagates information through both sentiment words and features, we call it double propagation. The extraction rules are designed based on relations described in dependency trees. A new method is also proposed to assign polarities to newly discovered sentiment words in a domain. Experimental results show that our approach is able to extract a large number of new sentiment words. The polarity assignment method is also effective.


Qiu

AAAI Conferences

In most sentiment analysis applications, the sentiment lexicon plays a key role. However, it is hard, if not impossible, to collect and maintain a universal sentiment lexicon for all application domains because different words may be used in different domains. The main existing technique extracts such sentiment words from a large domain corpus based on different conjunctions and the idea of sentiment coherency in a sentence. In this paper, we propose a novel propagation approach that exploits the relations between sentiment words and topics or product features that the sentiment words modify, and also sentiment words and product features themselves to extract new sentiment words. As the method propagates information through both sentiment words and features, we call it double propagation. The extraction rules are designed based on relations described in dependency trees. A new method is also proposed to assign polarities to newly discovered sentiment words in a domain. Experimental results show that our approach is able to extract a large number of new sentiment words. The polarity assignment method is also effective.