Affordances as Transferable Knowledge for Planning Agents

AAAI Conferences

Robotic agents often map perceptual input to simplified representations that do not reflect the complexity and richness of the world. This simplification is due in large part to the limitations of planning algorithms, which fail in large stochastic state spaces on account of the well-known "curse of dimensionality." Existing approaches to address this problem fail to prevent autonomous agents from considering many actions which would be obviously irrelevant to a human solving the same problem. We formalize the notion of affordances as knowledge added to an Markov Decision Process (MDP) that prunes actions in a state- and reward- general way. This pruning significantly reduces the number of state-action pairs the agent needs to evaluate in order to act near-optimally. We demonstrate our approach in the Minecraft domain as a model for robotic tasks, showing significant increase in speed and reduction in state-space exploration during planning. Further, we provide a learning framework that enables an agent to learn affordances through experience, opening the door for agents to learn to adapt and plan through new situations. We provide preliminary results indicating that the learning process effectively produces affordances that help solve an MDP faster, suggesting that affordances serve as an effective, transferable piece of knowledge for planning agents in large state spaces.


What Can I Not Do? Towards an Architecture for Reasoning about and Learning Affordances

AAAI Conferences

This paper describes an architecture for an agent to learn and reason about affordances. In this architecture, Answer Set Prolog, a declarative language, is used to represent and reason with incomplete domain knowledge that includes a representation of affordances as relations defined jointly over objects and actions. Reinforcement learning and decision-tree induction based on this relational representation and observations of action outcomes are used to interactively and cumulatively (a) acquire knowledge of affordances of specific objects being operated upon by specific agents; and (b) generalize from these specific learned instances. The capabilities of this architecture are illustrated and evaluated in two simulated domains, a variant of the classic Blocks World domain, and a robot assisting humans in an office environment.



Hierarchical Skills and Skill-based Representation

AAAI Conferences

Autonomous robots demand complex behavior to deal with unstructured environments. To meet these expectations, a robot needs to address a suite of problems associated with long term knowledge acquisition, representation, and execution in the presence of partial information. In this paper, we address these issues by the acquisition of broad, domain general skills using an intrinsically motivated reward function. We show how these skills can be represented compactly and used hierarchically to obtain complex manipulation skills. We further present a Bayesian model using the learned skills to model objects in the world, in terms of the actions they afford. We argue that our knowledge representation allows a robot to both predict the dynamics of objects in the world as well as recognize them.


Cognitive Affordance Representations in Uncertain Logic

AAAI Conferences

The concept of "affordance" represents the relationship between human perceivers and their environment. Affordance perception, representation, and inference are central to commonsense reasoning, tool-use and creative problem-solving in artificial agents. Existing approaches fail to provide flexibility with which to reason about affordances in the open world, where they are influenced by changing context, social norms, historical precedence, and uncertainty. We develop a formal rules-based logical representational format coupled with an uncertainty-processing framework to reason about cognitive affordances in a more general manner than shown in the existing literature. Our framework allows agents to make deductive and abductive inferences about functional and social affordances, collectively and dynamically, thereby allowing the agent to adapt to changing conditions. We demonstrate our approach with an example, and show that an agent can successfully reason through situations that involve a tight interplay between various social and functional norms.