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A Simple Approach to Multilingual Polarity Classification in Twitter

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recently, sentiment analysis has received a lot of attention due to the interest in mining opinions of social media users. Sentiment analysis consists in determining the polarity of a given text, i.e., its degree of positiveness or negativeness. Traditionally, Sentiment Analysis algorithms have been tailored to a specific language given the complexity of having a number of lexical variations and errors introduced by the people generating content. In this contribution, our aim is to provide a simple to implement and easy to use multilingual framework, that can serve as a baseline for sentiment analysis contests, and as starting point to build new sentiment analysis systems. We compare our approach in eight different languages, three of them have important international contests, namely, SemEval (English), TASS (Spanish), and SENTIPOLC (Italian). Within the competitions our approach reaches from medium to high positions in the rankings; whereas in the remaining languages our approach outperforms the reported results.


Yoshida

AAAI Conferences

Sentiment analysis is the task of determining the attitude (positive or negative) of documents. While the polarity of words in the documents is informative for this task, polarity of some words cannot be determined without domain knowledge. Detecting word polarity thus poses a challenge for multiple-domain sentiment analysis. Previous approaches tackle this problem with transfer learning techniques, but they cannot handle multiple source domains and multiple target domains. This paper proposes a novel Bayesian probabilistic model to handle multiple source and multiple target domains.


Using Verbs and Adjectives to Automatically Classify Blog Sentiment

AAAI Conferences

This paper presents experiments on subjectivity and polarity classifications of topic-and genre-independent blog posts, making novel use of a linguistic feature, verb class information, and of an online resource, the Wikipedia dictionary, for determining the polarity of adjectives. Each post from a blog is classified as objective, positive, or negative. Our method of determining the polarity of adjectives has an accuracy rate of 90.9%. Accuracy rates of two verb classes demonstrating polarity are 89.3% and 91.2%. Initial classifier results show blog-post accuracies with significant increases above the established baseline classification.


Sentiment Analysis with Global Topics and Local Dependency

AAAI Conferences

With the development of Web 2.0, sentiment analysis has now become a popular research problem to tackle. Recently, topic models have been introduced for the simultaneous analysis for topics and the sentiment in a document. These studies, which jointly model topic and sentiment, take the advantage of the relationship between topics and sentiment, and are shown to be superior to traditional sentiment analysis tools. However, most of them make the assumption that, given the parameters, the sentiments of the words in the document are all independent. In our observation, in contrast, sentiments are expressed in a coherent way. The local conjunctive words, such as “and” or “but”, are often indicative of sentiment transitions. In this paper, we propose a major departure from the previous approaches by making two linked contributions. First, we assume that the sentiments are related to the topic in the document, and put forward a joint sentiment and topic model, i.e. Sentiment-LDA. Second, we observe that sentiments are dependent on local context. Thus, we further extend the Sentiment-LDA model to Dependency-Sentiment-LDA model by relaxing the sentiment independent assumption in Sentiment-LDA. The sentiments of words are viewed as a Markov chain in Dependency-Sentiment-LDA. Through experiments, we show that exploiting the sentiment dependency is clearly advantageous, and that the Dependency-Sentiment-LDA is an effective approach for sentiment analysis.


Pars-ABSA: An Aspect-based Sentiment Analysis Dataset in Persian

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Due to the increased availability of online reviews, sentiment analysis had been witnessed a booming interest from the researchers. Sentiment analysis is a computational treatment of sentiment used to extract and understand the opinions of authors. While many systems were built to predict the sentiment of a document or a sentence, many others provide the necessary detail on various aspects of the entity (i.e. aspect-based sentiment analysis). Most of the available data resources were tailored to English and the other popular European languages. Although Persian is a language with more than 110 million speakers, to the best of our knowledge, there is not any public dataset on aspect-based sentiment analysis in Persian. This paper provides a manually annotated Persian dataset, Pars-ABSA, which is verified by 3 native Persian speakers. The dataset consists of 5114 positive, 3061 negative and 1827 neutral data samples from 5602 unique reviews. Moreover, as a baseline, this paper reports the performance of some state-of-the-art aspect-based sentiment analysis methods with a focus on deep learning, on Pars-ABSA. The obtained results are impressive compared to similar English state-of-the-art.