Co-Training Based Bilingual Sentiment Lexicon Learning

AAAI Conferences

In this paper, we address the issue of bilingual sentiment lexicon learning(BSLL) which aims to automatically and simultaneously generate sentiment words for two languages. The underlying motivation is that sentiment information from two languages can perform iterative mutual-teaching in the learning procedure. We propose to develop two classifiers to determine the sentiment polarities of words under a co-training framework, which makes full use of the two-view sentiment information from the two languages. The word alignment derived from the parallel corpus is leveraged to design effective features and to bridge the learning of the two classifiers. The experimental results on English and Chinese languages show the effectiveness of our approach in BSLL.


Acquiring Commonsense Knowledge for Sentiment Analysis through Human Computation

AAAI Conferences

Many Artificial Intelligence tasks need large amounts of commonsense knowledge. Because obtaining this knowledge through machine learning would require a huge amount of data, a better alternative is to elicit it from people through human computation. We consider the sentiment classification task, where knowledge about the contexts that impact word polarities is crucial, but hard to acquire from data. We describe a novel task design that allows us to crowdsource this knowledge through Amazon Mechanical Turk with high quality. We show that the commonsense knowledge acquired in this way dramatically improves the performance of established sentiment classification methods.


Sentiment Analysis with AFINN Lexicon – Himanshu Lohiya – Medium

#artificialintelligence

The AFINN lexicon is perhaps one of the simplest and most popular lexicons that can be used extensively for sentiment analysis. The current version of the lexicon is AFINN-en-165. You can find this lexicon at the author's official GitHub repository. The author has also created a nice wrapper library on top of this in Python called afinn, which we will be using for our analysis. Let's look at some visualisations now.


How Translation Alters Sentiment

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Sentiment analysis research has predominantly been on English texts. Thus there exist many sentiment resources for English, but less so for other languages. Approaches to improve sentiment analysis in a resource-poor focus language include: (a) translate the focus language text into a resource-rich language such as English, and apply a powerful English sentiment analysis system on the text, and (b) translate resources such as sentiment labeled corpora and sentiment lexicons from English into the focus language, and use them as additional resources in the focus-language sentiment analysis system. In this paper we systematically examine both options. We use Arabic social media posts as stand-in for the focus language text. We show that sentiment analysis of English translations of Arabic texts produces competitive results, w.r.t.


Lei

AAAI Conferences

Deep neural networks have gained great success recently for sentiment classification. However, these approaches do not fully exploit the linguistic knowledge. In this paper, we propose a novel sentiment lexicon enhanced attention-based LSTM (SLEA-LSTM) model to improve the performance of sentence-level sentiment classification.