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Beierle

AAAI Conferences

Reasoning in the context of a conditional knowledge base containing rules of the form'If A then usually B' can be defined in terms of preference relations on possible worlds. These preference relations can be modeled by ranking functions that assign a degree of disbelief to each possible world. In general, there are multiple ranking functions that accept a given knowledge base. Several nonmonotonic inference relations have been proposed using c-representations, a subset of all ranking functions. These inference relations take subsets of all c-representations based on various notions of minimality into account, and they operate in different inference modes, i.e., skeptical, weakly skeptical, or credulous. For nonmonotonic inference relations, weaker versions of monotonicity like rational monotony (RM) and weak rational monotony (WRM) have been developed. In this paper, we investigate which of the inference relations induced by sets of minimal c-representations satisfy rational monotony or weak rational monotony.


An Experimental Analysis of Possibilistic Default Reasoning

AAAI Conferences

This article provides an experimental analysis of the possibilistic handling of default rules. Three different nonmonotonic consequence relations are considered: minimum specificity inference (MSP), lexicographical closure (LC), and epsilon-belief functions (LCD). The latter was initially proposed within the belief function framework; it is rephrased here within a possibility theory framework. These three consequence relations share some properties but differ on others, which allows for an experimental test of their psychological plausibility.


Amid Blisters and Monotony, Hockey Marathon Hits 7th Day

U.S. News

Andrew Tokasz puts his feet up to catch a breather as Team White's only substitute as the 11-day hockey marathon entered its seventh day in Buffalo, N.Y., early Thursday, June 29, 2017. Having overcome blisters and lack of sleep, a group of 40 Buffalo hockey players are trying to raise money for cancer research and break the record for longest continuous game.


Change in Abstract Argumentation Frameworks: Adding an Argument

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

In this paper, we address the problem of change in an abstract argumentation system. We focus on a particular change: the addition of a new argument which interacts with previous arguments. We study the impact of such an addition on the outcome of the argumentation system, more particularly on the set of its extensions. Several properties for this change operation are defined by comparing the new set of extensions to the initial one, these properties are called structural when the comparisons are based on set-cardinality or set-inclusion relations. Several other properties are proposed where comparisons are based on the status of some particular arguments: the accepted arguments; these properties refer to the evolution of this status during the change, e.g., Monotony and Priority to Recency. All these properties may be more or less desirable according to specific applications. They are studied under two particular semantics: the grounded and preferred semantics.


Claudette Cayrol Florence Dupin de Saint-Cyr Marie-Christine Lagasquie-Schiex

AAAI Conferences

In this paper, we address the problem of change in an abstract argumentation system. We focus on a particular change: the addition of a new argument which interacts with previous arguments. We study the impact of such an addition on the outcome of the argumentation system, more particularly on the set of its extensions. Several properties for this change operation are defined by comparing the new set of extensions to the initial one, these properties are called "structural" when the comparisons are based on set-cardinality or setinclusion relations. Several other properties are proposed where comparisons are based on the status of some particular arguments: the accepted arguments; these properties refer to the "evolution of this status" during the change, e.g., Monotony and Priority to Recency. All these properties may be more or less desirable according to specific applications. They are studied under two particular semantics: the grounded and preferred semantics.