CAPIR: Collaborative Action Planning with Intention Recognition

AAAI Conferences

We apply decision theoretic techniques to construct non-player characters that are able to assist a human player in collaborative games. The method is based on solving Markov decision processes, which can be difficult when the game state is described by many variables. To scale to more complex games, the method allows decomposition of a game task into subtasks, each of which can be modelled by a Markov decision process. Intention recognition is used to infer the subtask that the human is currently performing, allowing the helper to assist the human in performing the correct task. Experiments show that the method can be effective, giving near-human level performance in helping a human in a collaborative game.


Artificial intelligence goes deep to beat humans at poker

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Machines are finally getting the best of humans at poker. Two artificial intelligence (AI) programs have finally proven they "know when to hold'em, and when to fold'em," recently beating human professional card players for the first time at the popular poker game of Texas Hold'em. And this week the team behind one of those AIs, known as DeepStack, has divulged some of the secrets to its success--a triumph that could one day lead to AIs that perform tasks ranging from from beefing up airline security to simplifying business negotiations. AIs have long dominated games such as chess, and last year one conquered Go, but they have made relatively lousy poker players. In DeepStack researchers have broken their poker losing streak by combining new algorithms and deep machine learning, a form of computer science that in some ways mimics the human brain, allowing machines to teach themselves.


DeepMind - Wikipedia

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DeepMind Technologies is a British artificial intelligence company founded in September 2010, currently owned by Alphabet Inc.. The company is based in London, but has research centres in California, Canada[4], and France[5]. Acquired by Google in 2014, the company has created a neural network that learns how to play video games in a fashion similar to that of humans,[6] as well as a Neural Turing machine,[7] or a neural network that may be able to access an external memory like a conventional Turing machine, resulting in a computer that mimics the short-term memory of the human brain.[8][9] The company made headlines in 2016 after its AlphaGo program beat a human professional Go player for the first time in October 2015[10] and again when AlphaGo beat Lee Sedol, the world champion, in a five-game match, which was the subject of a documentary film.[11] A more generic program, AlphaZero, beat the most powerful programs playing go, chess and shogi (Japanese chess) after a few hours of play against itself using reinforcement learning.[12]


AlphaGo, Deep Learning, and the Future of the Human Microscopist

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In March of last year, Google's (Menlo Park, California) artificial intelligence (AI) computer program AlphaGo beat the best Go player in the world, 18-time champion Lee Se-dol, in a tournament, winning 4 of 5 games.1 At first glance this news would seem of little interest to a pathologist, or to anyone else for that matter. After all, many will remember that IBM's (Armonk, New York) computer program Deep Blue beat Garry Kasparov--at the time the greatest chess player in the world--and that was 19 years ago. The rules of the several-thousand-year-old game of Go are extremely simple. The board consists of 19 horizontal and 19 vertical black lines.


Time to Fold, Humans: Poker-Playing AI Beats Pros at Texas Hold'em

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It is no mystery why poker is such a popular pastime: the dynamic card game produces drama in spades as players are locked in a complicated tango of acting and reacting that becomes increasingly tense with each escalating bet. The same elements that make poker so entertaining have also created a complex problem for artificial intelligence (AI). A study published today in Science describes an AI system called DeepStack that recently defeated professional human players in heads-up, no-limit Texas hold'em poker, an achievement that represents a leap forward in the types of problems AI systems can solve. DeepStack, developed by researchers at the University of Alberta, relies on the use of artificial neural networks that researchers trained ahead of time to develop poker intuition. During play, DeepStack uses its poker smarts to break down a complicated game into smaller, more manageable pieces that it can then work through on the fly.