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Collaborating Authors

Keeping the Player on an Emotional Trajectory in Interactive Storytelling

AAAI Conferences

Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques have been widely used in video games to control non-playable characters. More recently, AI has been applied to automated story generation with the objective of managing the player's experience in an interactive narrative. Such AI experience managers can generate and adapt narrative dynamically, often in response to the player's in-game actions. We implement and evaluate a recently proposed AI experience manager, PACE, which predicts the player's emotional response to a narrative event and uses such predictions to shape the narrative to keep the player on an author-supplied target emotional curve.


Telling Interactive Player-specific Stories and Planning for It: ASD + PaSSAGE = PAST

AAAI Conferences

Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques have been used to improve overall player satisfaction in video games. A thriving area of such research is interactive AI-assisted story-telling. One such line of research explored gains of automatically fitting the story to each individual player during the game via player modeling. Another research line used AI planning techniques to create contingency stories at design time. In this paper we propose a principled way to combine these two lines of research. We describe a system that uses a player model both at the design time and at the play time to generate and select stories fitting a specific player. We implement an early prototype and present it in the paper.


A Call for Emotion Modeling in Interactive Storytelling

AAAI Conferences

Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques are widely used in video games. Recently, AI planning methods have been applied to maintain plot consistency in the face of player’s agency over the narrative. Combined with an automatically populated player model, such AI experience managers can dynamically create a consistent narrative tailored to a specific player. These tools help game narrative designers achieve narrative goals while affording players a choice. On the other hand, they increase the number of feasible plot branches making it more difficult for the author to ensure that each branch carries the player along a desired emotion arc. In this paper we discuss the problem and call for an extension of experience managers with player emotion models. When successful, interactive narrative can be then automatically produced to satisfy authorial goals not only in terms of specific events but also in terms of emotions evoked in the player.


Emotion-Based Interactive Storytelling with Artificial Intelligence

AAAI Conferences

Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques have been widely used in video games to control non-playable characters. More recently, AI has been applied to automated story generation and game-mastering: managing the player’s experience in an interactive narrative on-the-fly. Such methods allow the narrative to be generated dynamically, in response to the player’s in-game actions. As a result, it is more difficult for the human game designers to ensure that each possible narrative trajectory will elicit desired emotional response from the player. We tackle this problem by computationally predicting the player’s emotional response to a narrative segment. We use the predictions within an AI experience manager to shape the narrative dynamically during the game to keep the player on an author-supplied target emotional curve.


Interactive Storytelling: A Player Modelling Approach

AAAI Conferences

In recent years, the fields of Interactive Storytelling and Player Modelling have independently enjoyed increased interest in both academia and the computer games industry. The combination of these technologies, however, remains largely unexplored. In this paper, we present PaSSAGE (Player-Specific Stories via Automatically Generated Events), an interactive storytelling system that uses player modelling to automatically learn a model of the player's preferred style of play, and then uses that model to dynamically select the content of an interactive story. Results from a user study evaluating the entertainment value of adaptive stories created by our system as well as two fixed, pre-authored stories indicate that automatically adapting a story based on learned player preferences can increase the enjoyment of playing a computer roleplaying game for certain types of players.