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Ware

AAAI Conferences

The typical goal of an experience manager in an interactive narrative is to create a sense of shared authorship that lends the player freedom to personalize the experience while still meeting the author's constraints on structure. This can be difficult when the player and author only communicate with one another through their actions. Each new action causes new questions to arise, assumptions to be made, and old questions to be answered. In this paper, I propose a technique called Mutual Implicit Question Answering, or MIQA, designed to allow an experience manager to both perceive and influence the momentum of an interactive story. It combines a generative model of narrative planning with analytical models of question answering and salience. I also present the results of a small, qualitative study of how people construct interactive narratives that lends insight for the eventual evaluation of a MIQA experience manager.


Poo Hernandez

AAAI Conferences

Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques have been widely used in video games to control non-playable characters. More recently, AI has been applied to automated story generation with the objective of managing the player's experience in an interactive narrative. Such AI experience managers can generate and adapt narrative dynamically, often in response to the player's in-game actions. We implement and evaluate a recently proposed AI experience manager, PACE, which predicts the player's emotional response to a narrative event and uses such predictions to shape the narrative to keep the player on an author-supplied target emotional curve.


Poo Hernandez

AAAI Conferences

Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques are widely used in video games. Recently, AI planning methods have been applied to maintain plot consistency in the face of player's agency over the narrative. Combined with an automatically populated player model, such AI experience managers can dynamically create a consistent narrative tailored to a specific player. These tools help game narrative designers achieve narrative goals while affording players a choice. On the other hand, they increase the number of feasible plot branches making it more difficult for the author to ensure that each branch carries the player along a desired emotion arc. In this paper we discuss the problem and call for an extension of experience managers with player emotion models. When successful, interactive narrative can be then automatically produced to satisfy authorial goals not only in terms of specific events but also in terms of emotions evoked in the player.


Cardona-Rivera

AAAI Conferences

Interactive narratives suffer from the narrative paradox: the tension that exists between providing a coherent narrative experience and allowing a player free reign over what she can manipulate in the environment. Knowing what actions a player in such an environment intends to carry out would help in managing the narrative paradox, since it would allow us to anticipate potential threats to the intended narrative experience and potentially mediate or eliminate them. The process of observing player actions and attempting to come up with an explanation for those actions (i.e. the plan that the player is trying to carry out) is the problem of plan recognition. We adopt the framing of narratives as plans and leverage recent advances that cast plan recognition as planning to develop a symbolic plan recognition system as a proof-of-concept model of a player's reasoning in an interactive narrative environment. In this paper we outline the system architecture, report on performance metrics that demonstrate adequate performance for non-trivial domains, and discuss the implications of treating players as plan recognizers.


Interactive Narrative: An Intelligent Systems Approach

AI Magazine

The goal of an interactive narrative system is to immerse users in a virtual world such that they believe that they are an integral part of an unfolding story and that their actions can significantly alter the direction or outcome of the story. In this article we review the ways in which artificial intelligence can be brought to bear on the creation of interactive narrative systems. We lay out the landscape of about 20 years of interactive narrative research and explore the successes as well as open research questions pertaining to the novel use of computational narrative intelligence in the pursuit of entertainment, education, and training. The prevalence of storytelling in human culture may be explained by the use of narrative as a cognitive tool for situated understanding (Gerrig 1993). This narrative intelligence -- the ability to organize experience into narrative form -- is central to the cognitive processes employed across a range of experiences, from entertainment to active learning.