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You Are Known by How You Vlog: Personality Impressions and Nonverbal Behavior in YouTube

AAAI Conferences

An increasing interest in understanding human perception in social media has led to the study of the processes of personality self-presentation and impression formation based on user profiles and text blogs. However, despite the popularity of online video, we do not know of any attempt to study personality impressions that go beyond the use of text and still photos. In this paper, we analyze one facet of YouTube as a repository of brief behavioral slices in the form of personal conversational vlogs, which are a unique medium for self-presentation and interpersonal perception. We investigate the use of nonverbal cues as descriptors of vloggers' behavior and find significant associations between automatically extracted nonverbal cues for several personality judgments. As one notable result, audio and visual cues together can be used to predict 34% of the variance of the Extraversion trait of the Big Five model. In addition, we explore the associations between vloggers' personality scores and the level of social attention that their videos received in YouTube. Our study is conducted on a dataset of 442 YouTube vlogs and 2,210 annotations collected using Amazon's Mechanical Turk.


Biel

AAAI Conferences

We address the study of interpersonal perception in social conversational video based on multifaceted impressions collected from short video-watching. First, we crowdsourced the annotation of personality, attractiveness, and mood impressions for a dataset of YouTube vloggers, generating a corpora that has potential to develop automatic techniques for vlogger characterization. Then, we provide an analysis of the crowdsourced annotations focusing on the level of agreement among annotators, as well as the interplay between different impressions. Overall, this work provides interesting new insights on vlogger impressions and the use of crowdsourcing to collect behavioral annotations from multimodal data.


Voices of Vlogging

AAAI Conferences

Vlogs have rapidly evolved from the ’chat from your bedroom’ format to a highly creative form of expression and communication. However, despite the high popularity of vlogging, automatic analysis of conversational vlogs have not been attempted in the literature. In this paper, we present a novel analysis of conversational vlogs based on the characterization of vloggers’ nonverbal behavior. We investigate the use of four nonverbal cues extracted automatically from the audio channel to measure the behavior of vloggers and explore the relation to their degree of popularity and that of their videos. Our study is validated on over 2200 videos and 150 hours of data, and shows that one nonverbal cue (speaking time) is correlated with levels of popularity with a medium size effect.


Biel

AAAI Conferences

An increasing interest in understanding human perception in social media has led to the study of the processes of personality self-presentation and impression formation based on user profiles and text blogs. However, despite the popularity of online video, we do not know of any attempt to study personality impressions that go beyond the use of text and still photos. In this paper, we analyze one facet of YouTube as a repository of brief behavioral slices in the form of personal conversational vlogs, which are a unique medium for self-presentation and interpersonal perception. We investigate the use of nonverbal cues as descriptors of vloggers' behavior and find significant associations between automatically extracted nonverbal cues for several personality judgments. As one notable result, audio and visual cues together can be used to predict 34% of the variance of the Extraversion trait of the Big Five model. In addition, we explore the associations between vloggers' personality scores and the level of social attention that their videos received in YouTube. Our study is conducted on a dataset of 442 YouTube vlogs and 2,210 annotations collected using Amazon's Mechanical Turk.


Is Your Profile Picture Worth 1000 Words? Photo Characteristics Associated with Personality Impression Agreement

AAAI Conferences

Social-Networking Websites (SNWs) are rapidly becoming a central media for social exchange. A basic question is how well are people able to get to know each other through these websites? In this study, we explore characteristics of the profile photographs and their association with impression agreement. Using a specially designed social networking website, we examined 1,316 first-impressions of profile owners who had posted photographs as part of a complete profile. The results suggest that photographs in which the profile owners were smiling, outdoors, and shown with others were associated with higher impression agreement. Several gender interactions suggested that other aspects of the photographs, including head covering and apparent weight, also affected impression agreement depending on the gender of the profile owner and visitors. These results were interpreted in light of the literature on interpersonal perception.