Wu

AAAI Conferences

We study tag recommendation for questions in community question answering (CQA). Tags represent the semantic summarization of questions are useful for navigation and expert finding in CQA and can facilitate content consumption such as searching and mining in these web sites. The task is challenging, as both questions and tags are short and a large fraction of tags are tail tags which occur very infrequently. To solve these problems, we propose matching questions and tags not only by themselves, but also by similar questions and similar tags. The idea is then formalized as a model in which we calculate question-tag similarity using a linear combination of similarity with similar questions and tags weighted by tag importance.Question similarity, tag similarity, and tag importance are learned in a supervised random walk framework by fusing multiple features. Our model thus can not only accurately identify question-tag similarity for head tags, but also improve the accuracy of recommendation of tail tags. Experimental results show that the proposed method significantly outperforms state-of-the-art methods on tag recommendation for questions. Particularly, it improves tail tag recommendation accuracy by a large margin.


Fusion Strategies for Learning User Embeddings with Neural Networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Growing amounts of online user data motivate the need for automated processing techniques. In case of user ratings, one interesting option is to use neural networks for learning to predict ratings given an item and a user. While training for prediction, such an approach at the same time learns to map each user to a vector, a so-called user embedding. Such embeddings can for example be valuable for estimating user similarity. However, there are various ways how item and user information can be combined in neural networks, and it is unclear how the way of combining affects the resulting embeddings. In this paper, we run an experiment on movie ratings data, where we analyze the effect on embedding quality caused by several fusion strategies in neural networks. For evaluating embedding quality, we propose a novel measure, Pair-Distance Correlation, which quantifies the condition that similar users should have similar embedding vectors. We find that the fusion strategy affects results in terms of both prediction performance and embedding quality. Surprisingly, we find that prediction performance not necessarily reflects embedding quality. This suggests that if embeddings are of interest, the common tendency to select models based on their prediction ability should be reconsidered.


Increase Retail Sales with Recommendations Lucidworks

#artificialintelligence

Retailers know that it is harder and more expensive to acquire new customers than to sell new things to existing customers. That's why they spend a lot on loyalty programs and Customer 360/Customer Journey programs. One of the best tools a retailer has for selling products to customers is recommendations.


Gesture Salience as a Hidden Variable for Coreference Resolution and Keyframe Extraction

AAAI Conferences

Gesture is a nonverbal modality that can contribute crucial information to the understanding of natural language. But not all gestures are informative, and non-communicative hand motions may confuse natural language processing (NLP) and impede learning. People have little difficulty ignoring irrelevant hand movements and focusing on meaningful gestures, suggesting that an automatic system could also be trained to perform this task. However, the informativeness of a gesture is context-dependent and labeling enough data to cover all cases would be expensive. We present conditional modality fusion, a conditional hidden-variable model that learns to predict which gestures are salient for coreference resolution, the task of determining whether two noun phrases refer to the same semantic entity. Moreover, our approach uses only coreference annotations, and not annotations of gesture salience itself. We show that gesture features improve performance on coreference resolution, and that by attending only to gestures that are salient, our method achieves further significant gains. In addition, we show that the model of gesture salience learned in the context of coreference accords with human intuition, by demonstrating that gestures judged to be salient by our model can be used successfully to create multimedia keyframe summaries of video. These summaries are similar to those created by human raters, and significantly outperform summaries produced by baselines from the literature.


Gesture Salience as a Hidden Variable for Coreference Resolution and Keyframe Extraction

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Gesture is a non-verbal modality that can contribute crucial information to the understanding of natural language. But not all gestures are informative, and non-communicative hand motions may confuse natural language processing (NLP) and impede learning. People have little diffculty ignoring irrelevant hand movements and focusing on meaningful gestures, suggesting that an automatic system could also be trained to perform this task. However, the informativeness of a gesture is context-dependent and labeling enough data to cover all cases would be expensive. We present conditional modality fusion, a conditional hidden-variable model that learns to predict which gestures are salient for coreference resolution, the task of determining whether two noun phrases refer to the same semantic entity. Moreover, our approach uses only coreference annotations, and not annotations of gesture salience itself. We show that gesture features improve performance on coreference resolution, and that by attending only to gestures that are salient, our method achieves further significant gains. In addition, we show that the model of gesture salience learned in the context of coreference accords with human intuition, by demonstrating that gestures judged to be salient by our model can be used successfully to create multimedia keyframe summaries of video. These summaries are similar to those created by human raters, and significantly outperform summaries produced by baselines from the literature.