Deeply Moving: Deep Learning for Sentiment Analysis

@machinelearnbot

Recursive Deep Models for Semantic Compositionality Over a Sentiment Treebank Semantic word spaces have been very useful but cannot express the meaning of longer phrases in a principled way. Further progress towards understanding compositionality in tasks such as sentiment detection requires richer supervised training and evaluation resources and more powerful models of composition. To remedy this, we introduce a Sentiment Treebank. It includes fine grained sentiment labels for 215,154 phrases in the parse trees of 11,855 sentences and presents new challenges for sentiment compositionality. To address them, we introduce the Recursive Neural Tensor Network.



Evaluating WordNet Features in Text Classification Models

AAAI Conferences

Incorporating semantic features from the WordNet lexical database is among one of the many approaches that have been tried to improve the predictive performance of text classification models. The intuition behind this is that keywords in the training set alone may not be extensive enough to enable generation of a universal model for a category, but if we incorporate the word relationships in WordNet, a more accurate model may be possible. Other researchers have previously evaluated the effectiveness of incorporating WordNet synonyms, hypernyms, and hyponyms into text classification models. Generally, they have found that improvements in accuracy using features derived from these relationships are dependent upon the nature of the text corpora from which the document collections are extracted. In this paper, we not only reconsider the role of WordNet synonyms, hypernyms, and hyponyms in text classification models, we also consider the role of WordNet meronyms and holonyms. Incorporating these WordNet relationships into a Coordinate Matching classifier, a Naive Bayes classifier, and a Support Vector Machine classifier, we evaluate our approach on six document collections extracted from the Reuters-21578, USENET, and Digi-Trad text corpora. Experimental results show that none of the WordNet relationships were effective at increasing the accuracy of the Naive Bayes classifier. Synonyms, hypernyms, and holonyms were effective at increasing the accuracy of the Coordinate Matching classifier, and hypernyms were effective at increasing the accuracy of the SVM classifier.


Query Expansion in Information Retrieval Systems using a Bayesian Network-Based Thesaurus

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Information Retrieval (IR) is concerned with the identification of documents in a collection that are relevant to a given information need, usually represented as a query containing terms or keywords, which are supposed to be a good description of what the user is looking for. IR systems may improve their effectiveness (i.e., increasing the number of relevant documents retrieved) by using a process of query expansion, which automatically adds new terms to the original query posed by an user. In this paper we develop a method of query expansion based on Bayesian networks. Using a learning algorithm, we construct a Bayesian network that represents some of the relationships among the terms appearing in a given document collection; this network is then used as a thesaurus (specific for that collection). We also report the results obtained by our method on three standard test collections.


Cross-lingual Propagation for Morphological Analysis

AAAI Conferences

Multilingual parallel text corpora provide a powerful means for propagating linguistic knowledge across languages. We present a model which jointly learns linguistic structure for each language while inducing links between them. Our model supports fully symmetrical knowledge transfer, utilizing any combination of supervised and unsupervised data across language barriers. The proposed nonparametric Bayesian model effectively combines cross-lingual alignment with target language predictions. This architecture is a potent alternative to projection methods which decompose these decisions into two separate stages. We apply this approach to the task of morphological segmentation, where the goal is to separate a word into its individual morphemes. When tested on a parallel corpus of Hebrew and Arabic, our joint bilingual model effectively incorporates all available evidence from both languages, yielding significant performance gains.