Goto

Collaborating Authors

On Valid Optimal Assignment Kernels and Applications to Graph Classification

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The success of kernel methods has initiated the design of novel positive semidefinite functions, in particular for structured data. A leading design paradigm for this is the convolution kernel, which decomposes structured objects into their parts and sums over all pairs of parts. Assignment kernels, in contrast, are obtained from an optimal bijection between parts, which can provide a more valid notion of similarity. In general however, optimal assignments yield indefinite functions, which complicates their use in kernel methods. We characterize a class of base kernels used to compare parts that guarantees positive semidefinite optimal assignment kernels. These base kernels give rise to hierarchies from which the optimal assignment kernels are computed in linear time by histogram intersection. We apply these results by developing the Weisfeiler-Lehman optimal assignment kernel for graphs. It provides high classification accuracy on widely-used benchmark data sets improving over the original Weisfeiler-Lehman kernel.


On Valid Optimal Assignment Kernels and Applications to Graph Classification

Neural Information Processing Systems

The success of kernel methods has initiated the design of novel positive semidefinite functions, in particular for structured data. A leading design paradigm for this is the convolution kernel, which decomposes structured objects into their parts and sums over all pairs of parts. Assignment kernels, in contrast, are obtained from an optimal bijection between parts, which can provide a more valid notion of similarity. In general however, optimal assignments yield indefinite functions, which complicates their use in kernel methods. We characterize a class of base kernels used to compare parts that guarantees positive semidefinite optimal assignment kernels. These base kernels give rise to hierarchies from which the optimal assignment kernels are computed in linear time by histogram intersection. We apply these results by developing the Weisfeiler-Lehman optimal assignment kernel for graphs. It provides high classification accuracy on widely-used benchmark data sets improving over the original Weisfeiler-Lehman kernel.


Another day, another 4,600 lines of Linux kernel code

PCWorld

The Linux kernel is improving faster than ever, gaining 7.8 patches per hour and 4,600 lines of new code every day. That's according to a new report published Monday by the Linux Foundation and focusing on the state of kernel development. Entitled "Linux kernel development--how fast it is going, who is doing it, what they are doing, and who is sponsoring it," the report is the seventh the nonprofit has published on the topic in roughly as many years. This year's paper covers work completed through Linux kernel 4.7, with an emphasis on releases 3.19 to 4.7. The last report was released March 2015 and focused on versions 3.11 to 3.18.


Kernel quadrature with DPPs

Neural Information Processing Systems

We study quadrature rules for functions living in an RKHS, using nodes sampled from a projection determinantal point process (DPP). DPPs are parametrized by a kernel, and we use a truncated and saturated version of the RKHS kernel. This natural link between the two kernels, along with DPP machinery, leads to relatively tight bounds on the quadrature error, that depends on the spectrum of the RKHS kernel. Finally, we experimentally compare DPPs to existing kernel-based quadratures such as herding, Bayesian quadrature, or continuous leverage score sampling. Numerical results confirm the interest of DPPs, and even suggest faster rates than our bounds in particular cases.


The Multiscale Laplacian Graph Kernel

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Many real world graphs, such as the graphs of molecules, exhibit structure at multiple different scales, but most existing kernels between graphs are either purely local or purely global in character. In contrast, by building a hierarchy of nested subgraphs, the Multiscale Laplacian Graph kernels (MLG kernels) that we define in this paper can account for structure at a range of different scales. At the heart of the MLG construction is another new graph kernel, called the Feature Space Laplacian Graph kernel (FLG kernel), which has the property that it can lift a base kernel defined on the vertices of two graphs to a kernel between the graphs. The MLG kernel applies such FLG kernels to subgraphs recursively. To make the MLG kernel computationally feasible, we also introduce a randomized projection procedure, similar to the Nystr\"om method, but for RKHS operators.