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Practical Bayesian Optimization of Machine Learning Algorithms

Neural Information Processing Systems

The use of machine learning algorithms frequently involves careful tuning of learning parameters and model hyperparameters. Unfortunately, this tuning is often a “black art” requiring expert experience, rules of thumb, or sometimes brute-force search. There is therefore great appeal for automatic approaches that can optimize the performance of any given learning algorithm to the problem at hand. In this work, we consider this problem through the framework of Bayesian optimization, in which a learning algorithm’s generalization performance is modeled as a sample from a Gaussian process (GP). We show that certain choices for the nature of the GP, such as the type of kernel and the treatment of its hyperparameters, can play a crucial role in obtaining a good optimizer that can achieve expert-level performance. We describe new algorithms that take into account the variable cost (duration) of learning algorithm experiments and that can leverage the presence of multiple cores for parallel experimentation. We show that these proposed algorithms improve on previous automatic procedures and can reach or surpass human expert-level optimization for many algorithms including Latent Dirichlet Allocation, Structured SVMs and convolutional neural networks.


Practical Bayesian Optimization of Machine Learning Algorithms

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Machine learning algorithms frequently require careful tuning of model hyperparameters, regularization terms, and optimization parameters. Unfortunately, this tuning is often a "black art" that requires expert experience, unwritten rules of thumb, or sometimes brute-force search. Much more appealing is the idea of developing automatic approaches which can optimize the performance of a given learning algorithm to the task at hand. In this work, we consider the automatic tuning problem within the framework of Bayesian optimization, in which a learning algorithm's generalization performance is modeled as a sample from a Gaussian process (GP). The tractable posterior distribution induced by the GP leads to efficient use of the information gathered by previous experiments, enabling optimal choices about what parameters to try next. Here we show how the effects of the Gaussian process prior and the associated inference procedure can have a large impact on the success or failure of Bayesian optimization. We show that thoughtful choices can lead to results that exceed expert-level performance in tuning machine learning algorithms. We also describe new algorithms that take into account the variable cost (duration) of learning experiments and that can leverage the presence of multiple cores for parallel experimentation. We show that these proposed algorithms improve on previous automatic procedures and can reach or surpass human expert-level optimization on a diverse set of contemporary algorithms including latent Dirichlet allocation, structured SVMs and convolutional neural networks.


Transfer Learning for Prosthetics Using Imitation Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In this paper, We Apply Reinforcement learning (RL) techniques to train a realistic biomechanical model to work with different people and on different walking environments. We benchmarking 3 RL algorithms: Deep Deterministic Policy Gradient (DDPG), Trust Region Policy Optimization (TRPO) and Proximal Policy Optimization (PPO) in OpenSim environment, Also we apply imitation learning to a prosthetics domain to reduce the training time needed to design customized prosthetics. We use DDPG algorithm to train an original expert agent. We then propose a modification to the Dataset Aggregation (DAgger) algorithm to reuse the expert knowledge and train a new target agent to replicate that behaviour in fewer than 5 iterations, compared to the 100 iterations taken by the expert agent which means reducing training time by 95%. Our modifications to the DAgger algorithm improve the balance between exploiting the expert policy and exploring the environment. We show empirically that these improve convergence time of the target agent, particularly when there is some degree of variation between expert and naive agent.


Automatic Hip Fracture Identification and Functional Subclassification with Deep Learning

#artificialintelligence

To investigate the feasibility of automatic identification and classification of hip fractures using deep learning, which may improve outcomes by reducing diagnostic errors and decreasing time to operation. Hip and pelvic radiographs from 1118 studies were reviewed, and 3026 hips were labeled via bounding boxes and classified as normal, displaced femoral neck fracture, nondisplaced femoral neck fracture, intertrochanteric fracture, previous open reduction and internal fixation, or previous arthroplasty. A deep learning–based object detection model was trained to automate the placement of the bounding boxes. A Densely Connected Convolutional Neural Network (or DenseNet) was trained on a subset of the bounding box images, and its performance was evaluated on a held-out test set and by comparison on a 100-image subset with two groups of human observers: fellowship-trained radiologists and orthopedists; senior residents in emergency medicine, radiology, and orthopedics. The binary accuracy for detecting a fracture of this model was 93.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 90.8%, 96.5%), with a sensitivity of 93.2% (95% CI: 88.9%, 97.1%) and a specificity of 94.2% (95% CI: 89.7%, 98.4%).


Inverse reinforcement learning for video games

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Deep reinforcement learning achieves superhuman performance in a range of video game environments, but requires that a designer manually specify a reward function. It is often easier to provide demonstrations of a target behavior than to design a reward function describing that behavior. Inverse reinforcement learning (IRL) algorithms can infer a reward from demonstrations in low-dimensional continuous control environments, but there has been little work on applying IRL to high-dimensional video games. In our CNN-AIRL baseline, we modify the state-of-the-art adversarial IRL (AIRL) algorithm to use CNNs for the generator and discriminator. To stabilize training, we normalize the reward and increase the size of the discriminator training dataset. We additionally learn a low-dimensional state representation using a novel autoencoder architecture tuned for video game environments. This embedding is used as input to the reward network, improving the sample efficiency of expert demonstrations. Our method achieves high-level performance on the simple Catcher video game, substantially outperforming the CNN-AIRL baseline. We also score points on the Enduro Atari racing game, but do not match expert performance, highlighting the need for further work.