QLISP: A language for the interactive development of complex systems

Classics

This paper presents a functional overview of the features and capabilities of QLISP, one of the newest of the current generation of very high level languages developed for use in Artificial Intelligence (AI) research.QLISP is both a programming language and an interactive programming environment. It embeds an extended version of QA4, an earlier AI language, in INTERLISP, a widely available version of LISP with a variety of sophisticated programming aids.The language features provided by QLISP include a variety of useful data types, an associative data base for the storage and retrieval of expressions, the ability to associate property lists with arbitrary expressions, a powerful pattern matcher based on a unification algorithm, pattern-directed function invocation, "teams" of pattern invoked functions, a sophisticated mechanism for breaking a data base into contexts, generators for associative data retrieval, and easy extensibility.System features available in QLISP include a very smooth interaction with the underlying INTERLISP language, a facility for aggregating multiple pattern matches, and features for interactive control of programs.A number of applications to which QLISP has been put are briefly discussed, and some directions for future development are presented.SRI Tech.Note 120, AI Center, SRI International, Inc., Menlo Park, Calif.


AI teaches itself to complete the Rubik's cube in just 20 MOVES

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A deep-learning algorithm has been developed which can solve the Rubik's cube faster than any human can. It never fails to complete the puzzle, with a 100 per cent success rate and managing it in around 20 moves. Humans can beat the AI's mark of 18 seconds, the world record is around four seconds, but it is far more inefficient and people often require around 50 moves. It was created by University of California Irvine and can be tried out here. Given an unsolved cube, the machine must decide whether a specific move is an improvement on the existing configuration.


Rubik's cube solved in "fraction of a second" by artificial intelligence machine learning algorithm

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Researchers have developed an AI algorithm which can solve a Rubik's cube in a fraction of a second, according to a study published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence. The system, known as DeepCubeA, uses a form of machine learning which teaches itself how to play in order to crack the puzzle without being specifically coached by humans. "Artificial intelligence can defeat the world's best human chess and Go players, but some of the more difficult puzzles, such as the Rubik's Cube, had not been solved by computers, so we thought they were open for AI approaches," Pierre Baldi, one of the developers of the algorithm and computer scientist from the University of California, Irvine, said in a statement. According to Baldi, the latest development could herald a new generation of artificial intelligence (AI) deep-learning systems which are more advanced than those used in commercially available applications such as Siri and Alexa. "These systems are not really intelligent; they're brittle, and you can easily break or fool them," Baldi said.


UC Irvine Deep Learning Machine Teaches Itself To Solve A Rubik's Cube

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Anyone who has lived through the 1980s knows how maddeningly difficult it is to solve a Rubik's Cube, and to accomplish the feat without peeling the stickers off and rearranging them. Apparently the six-sided contraption presents a special kind of challenge to modern deep learning techniques that makes it more difficult than, say, learning to play chess or Go. That used to be the case, anyway. Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, have developed a new deep learning technique that can teach itself to solve the Rubik's Cube. What they come up with is very different than an algorithm designed to solve the toy from any position.


A robot hand taught itself to solve a Rubik's Cube after creating its own training regime

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Over a year ago, OpenAI, the San Francisco–based for-profit AI research lab, announced that it had trained a robotic hand to manipulate a cube with remarkable dexterity. That might not sound earth-shattering. But in the AI world, it was impressive for two reasons. First, the hand had taught itself how to fidget with the cube using a reinforcement-learning algorithm, a technique modeled on the way animals learn. Second, all the training had been done in simulation, but it managed to successfully translate to the real world.