Rapid Prototyping of Real-World Robot Systems Using Virtual Reality and Systems Simulation

AAAI Conferences

Researchers designing robots that can perform nontrivial behaviors in real-world environments are faced with a problem. There is a growing consensus that machines for several highly desirable applications, especially visually guided navigation and manipulation, must incorporate mechanisms peculiar to their function, and must interact with the world in order to derive the necessary information. This behavioral/active vision paradigm has been the subject of numerous recent papers, and several conferences. Basically, the philosophy holds that if a machine is going to work in a real world, you have to build and test it in that real world. Moreover, most of the intellectual effort required to produce such a machine revolves around the specific real-world interactions in which the machine must be involved.



Creative Collaborative Exploration in Multiple Environments

AAAI Conferences

We seek to support creativity in science, engineering, and design applications by building infrastructure that offers new capabilities for creative collaborative exploration of complex data in a variety of nontraditional computing environments. We describe particular novel environments and devices, including the Allosphere and the interactive Fogscreen, the software components to support collaborative interaction in mixed-media environments, and several key application scenarios that will leverage these capabilities. Our main focus is on supporting integrated visualization, sonification, and interaction capabilities in and across novel computing environments.


A Report to ARPA on Twenty-First Century Intelligent Systems

AI Magazine

The purpose of the meeting was to assist ARPA in defining an agenda for foundational AI research. Prior to the meeting, the fellows and officers of AAAI, as well as the report committee members, were asked to recommend areas in which major research thrusts could yield significant scientific gain--with high potential impact on DOD applications--over the next ten years. At the meeting, these suggestions and their relevance to current national needs and challenges in computing were discussed and debated. An initial draft of this report was circulated to the fellows and officers. The final report has benefited greatly from their comments and from textual revisions contributed by Joseph Halpern, Fernando Pereira, and Dana Nau. Computer systems are becoming commonplace; indeed, they are almost ubiquitous. We find them central to the functioning of most business, governmental, military, environmental, and healthcare organizations. They are also a part of many educational and training ...


A Report to ARPA on Twenty-First Century Intelligent Systems

AI Magazine

This report stems from an April 1994 meeting, organized by AAAI at the suggestion of Steve Cross and Gio Wiederhold.1 The purpose of the meeting was to assist ARPA in defining an agenda for foundational AI research. Prior to the meeting, the fellows and officers of AAAI, as well as the report committee members, were asked to recommend areas in which major research thrusts could yield significant scientific gain -- with high potential impact on DOD applications -- over the next ten years. At the meeting, these suggestions and their relevance to current national needs and challenges in computing were discussed and debated. An initial draft of this report was circulated to the fellows and officers. The final report has benefited greatly from their comments and from textual revisions contributed by Joseph Halpern, Fernando Pereira, and Dana Nau.