Using Deep Learning to Explore Local Physical Similarity for Global-scale Bridging in Thermal-hydraulic Simulation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Current system thermal-hydraulic codes have limited credibility in simulating real plant conditions, especially when the geometry and boundary conditions are extrapolated beyond the range of test facilities. This paper proposes a data-driven approach, Feature Similarity Measurement FFSM), to establish a technical basis to overcome these difficulties by exploring local patterns using machine learning. The underlying local patterns in multiscale data are represented by a set of physical features that embody the information from a physical system of interest, empirical correlations, and the effect of mesh size. After performing a limited number of high-fidelity numerical simulations and a sufficient amount of fast-running coarse-mesh simulations, an error database is built, and deep learning is applied to construct and explore the relationship between the local physical features and simulation errors. Case studies based on mixed convection have been designed for demonstrating the capability of data-driven models in bridging global scale gaps.


System uses 'deep learning' to detect cracks in nuclear reactors - Purdue University

@machinelearnbot

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – A system under development at Purdue University uses artificial intelligence to detect cracks captured in videos of nuclear reactors and represents a future inspection technology to help reduce accidents and maintenance costs.


How artificial intelligence is making nuclear reactors safer

#artificialintelligence

Engineers at Purdue University in Lafayette, Indiana are developing a new system for keeping nuclear reactors safe with artificial intelligence (AI). In the paper published in the IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics journal, the researchers introduced a deep learning framework called a naïve Bayes-convolutional neural network that can effectively identify cracks in reactors by analyzing individual video frames. The method could potentially make safety inspections safer.


Deep Learning on Summit Supercomputer Powers Insights for Nuclear Waste Remediation - insideHPC

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A research collaboration between LBNL, PNNL, Brown University, and NVIDIA has achieved exaflop (half-precision) performance on the Summit supercomputer with a deep learning application used to model subsurface flow in the study of nuclear waste remediation. Their achievement, which will be presented during the "Deep Learning on Supercomputers" workshop at SC19, demonstrates the promise of physics-informed generative adversarial networks (GANs) for analyzing complex, large-scale science problems. In science we know the laws of physics and observation principles – mass, momentum, energy, etc.," said George Karniadakis, professor of applied mathematics at Brown and co-author on the SC19 workshop paper. "The concept of physics-informed GANs is to encode prior information from the physics into the neural network. This allows you to go well beyond the training domain, which is very important in applications where the conditions can change." GANs have been applied to model human face ...


Artificial Intelligence Can Hunt Down Missile Sites in China Hundreds of Times Faster Than Humans

WIRED

Intelligence agencies have a limited number of trained human analysts looking for undeclared nuclear facilities, or secret military sites, hidden among terabytes of satellite images. But the same sort of deep learning artificial intelligence that enables Google and Facebook to automatically filter images of human faces and cats could also prove invaluable in the world of spy versus spy. An early example: US researchers have trained deep learning algorithms to identify Chinese surface-to-air missile sites--hundreds of times faster than their human counterparts.