Graph Pattern Mining and Learning through User-defined Relations (Extended Version)

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In this work we propose R-GPM, a parallel computing framework for graph pattern mining (GPM) through a user-defined subgraph relation. More specifically, we enable the computation of statistics of patterns through their subgraph classes, generalizing traditional GPM methods. R-GPM provides efficient estimators for these statistics by employing a MCMC sampling algorithm combined with several optimizations. We provide both theoretical guarantees and empirical evaluations of our estimators in application scenarios such as stochastic optimization of deep high-order graph neural network models and pattern (motif) counting. We also propose and evaluate optimizations that enable improvements of our estimators accuracy, while reducing their computational costs in up to 3-orders-of-magnitude. Finally,we show that R-GPM is scalable, providing near-linear speedups on 44 cores in all of our tests.


Should We Be Confident in Peer Effects Estimated From Social Network Crawls?

AAAI Conferences

Research in social network analysis and statistical relational learning has produced a number of methods for learning relational models from large-scale network data. Unfortunately, these methods have been developed under the unrealistic assumption of full data access. In practice, however, the data are often collected by crawling the network, due to proprietary access, limited resources, and privacy concerns. While prior studies have examined the impact of network crawling on the structural characteristics of the resulting samples, this work presents the first empirical study designed to assess the impact of widely used network crawlers on the estimation of peer effects. Our experiments demonstrate that the estimates obtained from network samples collected by existing crawlers can be quite inaccurate, unless a significant portion of the network is crawled. Meanwhile, motivated by recent advances in partial network crawling, we develop crawl-aware relational methods that provide accurate estimates of peer effects with statistical guarantees from partial crawls.


Stochastic Gradient Descent for Relational Logistic Regression via Partial Network Crawls

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Research in statistical relational learning has produced a number of methods for learning relational models from large-scale network data. While these methods have been successfully applied in various domains, they have been developed under the unrealistic assumption of full data access. In practice, however, the data are often collected by crawling the network, due to proprietary access, limited resources, and privacy concerns. Recently, we showed that the parameter estimates for relational Bayes classifiers computed from network samples collected by existing network crawlers can be quite inaccurate, and developed a crawl-aware estimation method for such models (Yang, Ribeiro, and Neville, 2017). In this work, we extend the methodology to learning relational logistic regression models via stochastic gradient descent from partial network crawls, and show that the proposed method yields accurate parameter estimates and confidence intervals.


From Monte Carlo to Las Vegas: Improving Restricted Boltzmann Machine Training Through Stopping Sets

AAAI Conferences

We propose a Las Vegas transformation of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimators of Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs). We denote our approach Markov Chain Las Vegas (MCLV). MCLV gives statistical guarantees in exchange for random running times. MCLV uses a stopping set built from the training data and has maximum number of Markov chain steps K (referred as MCLV-K). We present a MCLV-K gradient estimator (LVS-K) for RBMs and explore the correspondence and differences between LVS-K and Contrastive Divergence (CD-K), with LVS-K significantly outperforming CD-K training RBMs over the MNIST dataset, indicating MCLV to be a promising direction in learning generative models.


Estimating the Size of a Large Network and its Communities from a Random Sample

Neural Information Processing Systems

Most real-world networks are too large to be measured or studied directly and there is substantial interest in estimating global network properties from smaller sub-samples. One of the most important global properties is the number of vertices/nodes in the network. Estimating the number of vertices in a large network is a major challenge in computer science, epidemiology, demography, and intelligence analysis. In this paper we consider a population random graph G = (V;E) from the stochastic block model (SBM) with K communities/blocks. A sample is obtained by randomly choosing a subset W and letting G(W) be the induced subgraph in G of the vertices in W. In addition to G(W), we observe the total degree of each sampled vertex and its block membership. Given this partial information, we propose an efficient PopULation Size Estimation algorithm, called PULSE, that accurately estimates the size of the whole population as well as the size of each community. To support our theoretical analysis, we perform an exhaustive set of experiments to study the effects of sample size, K, and SBM model parameters on the accuracy of the estimates. The experimental results also demonstrate that PULSE significantly outperforms a widely-used method called the network scale-up estimator in a wide variety of scenarios.