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Employee surveillance doesn't increase productivity -- it's demotivating

#artificialintelligence

Writing for Aeon last week, Martin Parker, a professor of organization studies at the University of Bristol in the UK, relayed the origins of the word "management", explaining: It is derived from the Italian mano, meaning hand, and it's expansion into maneggiare, the activity of handling and training a horse carried out in a maneggio – a riding school. From this form of manual control, the word has expanded into a general activity of training and handling people. It is a word that originates with ideas of control, of a docile or wilful creature that must be subordinated to the instructions of the master. Though we might prefer to believe that its meaning has evolved since then to convey something more respectful and collaborative, it is still the case that workplace leaders and managers have mastery over their staff. Promotions, opportunities, hirings and firings -- all life-altering events -- are subject to their authority.


Critical Issues in Urban Education Coursera

@machinelearnbot

About this course: Urban school reform in the United States is characterized by contentious, politicized debate. This course explores a set of critical issues in the education and educational reform space, with a focus on aspects of the field that have sparked controversy and polarized views. We will dig into these debates, situating them within the larger history of public education and school reform, and considering the viewpoints, the evidence, and translation of issues into educational policy. We will consider three broad topics in this course: 1. Federal Strategies in School Reform: How has the federal government legislated and incented public school reform?


Emailing On Your Commute? That's Work, A New Study Says

NPR Technology

If employers pay for workers' time during their commutes, it could bring "more surveillance and accountability for productivity" along with its benefits for employees, researcher Juliet Jain says. If employers pay for workers' time during their commutes, it could bring "more surveillance and accountability for productivity" along with its benefits for employees, researcher Juliet Jain says. If you use your commute to catch up on work email, that time "should be counted as part of the working day," according to a new study by researchers who analyzed thousands of commuters' online habits. "If travel time were to count as work time, there would be many social and economic impacts," said Juliet Jain, one of the academics from the University of the West of England who surveyed several thousand commuters on trains in and out of London. "Many respondents expressed how they consider their commute as time to'catch up' with work, before or after their traditional working day," according to a summary of the study.


Taxpayers and Students Deserve Accountability From Higher Education

U.S. News

The defense to repayment fiasco keeps with the Feds' typical approach to higher education: mitigating the costs of a broken system in lieu of actually fixing it. We enact policies to help students manage their debt – forgiving much of it – so as to limit the damage after it's already been done. This approach is shortsighted and distracts from the real challenge: changing the incentives for institutions on the front end. It's time policymakers take seriously the need to protect taxpayer investments across higher education. Both parties have talked a big game, but taxpayers are still getting shafted.


School Choice Program Raises Questions About Accountability

U.S. News

In this photo taken Aug. 8, 2017, Kelsey Nellis, second from right, instructs employees in preparation for the start of the school year at the Mountain View Christian Schools in Las Vegas. More than a third of U.S. states have created school voucher programs that bypass thorny constitutional and political issues by turning them over to non-profits that rely primarily on businesses to fund them. But the programs are raising questions about transparency and accountability at a time when supporters are urging that it be expanded into a federal program.