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A Strong Baseline for Weekly Time Series Forecasting

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Many businesses and industries require accurate forecasts for weekly time series nowadays. The forecasting literature however does not currently provide easy-to-use, automatic, reproducible and accurate approaches dedicated to this task. We propose a forecasting method that can be used as a strong baseline in this domain, leveraging state-of-the-art forecasting techniques, forecast combination, and global modelling. Our approach uses four base forecasting models specifically suitable for forecasting weekly data: a global Recurrent Neural Network model, Theta, Trigonometric Box-Cox ARMA Trend Seasonal (TBATS), and Dynamic Harmonic Regression ARIMA (DHR-ARIMA). Those are then optimally combined using a lasso regression stacking approach. We evaluate the performance of our method against a set of state-of-the-art weekly forecasting models on six datasets. Across four evaluation metrics, we show that our method consistently outperforms the benchmark methods by a considerable margin with statistical significance. In particular, our model can produce the most accurate forecasts, in terms of mean sMAPE, for the M4 weekly dataset.


Improving the Accuracy of Global Forecasting Models using Time Series Data Augmentation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Forecasting models that are trained across sets of many time series, known as Global Forecasting Models (GFM), have shown recently promising results in forecasting competitions and real-world applications, outperforming many state-of-the-art univariate forecasting techniques. In most cases, GFMs are implemented using deep neural networks, and in particular Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN), which require a sufficient amount of time series to estimate their numerous model parameters. However, many time series databases have only a limited number of time series. In this study, we propose a novel, data augmentation based forecasting framework that is capable of improving the baseline accuracy of the GFM models in less data-abundant settings. We use three time series augmentation techniques: GRATIS, moving block bootstrap (MBB), and dynamic time warping barycentric averaging (DBA) to synthetically generate a collection of time series. The knowledge acquired from these augmented time series is then transferred to the original dataset using two different approaches: the pooled approach and the transfer learning approach. When building GFMs, in the pooled approach, we train a model on the augmented time series alongside the original time series dataset, whereas in the transfer learning approach, we adapt a pre-trained model to the new dataset. In our evaluation on competition and real-world time series datasets, our proposed variants can significantly improve the baseline accuracy of GFM models and outperform state-of-the-art univariate forecasting methods.


Forecasting Across Time Series Databases using Long Short-Term Memory Networks on Groups of Similar Series

arXiv.org Machine Learning

With the advent of Big Data, nowadays in many applications databases containing large quantities of similar time series are available. Forecasting time series in these domains with traditional univariate forecasting procedures leaves great potentials for producing accurate forecasts untapped. Recurrent neural networks, and in particular Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) networks have proven recently that they are able to outperform state-of-the-art univariate time series forecasting methods in this context, when trained across all available time series. However, if the time series database is heterogeneous accuracy may degenerate, so that on the way towards fully automatic forecasting methods in this space, a notion of similarity between the time series needs to be built into the methods. To this end, we present a prediction model using LSTMs on subgroups of similar time series, which are identified by time series clustering techniques. The proposed methodology is able to consistently outperform the baseline LSTM model, and it achieves competitive results on benchmarking datasets, in particular outperforming all other methods on the CIF2016 dataset.


Mixed pooling of seasonality in time series pallet forecasting

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Multiple seasonal patterns play a key role in time series forecasting, especially for business time series where seasonal effects are often dramatic. Previous approaches including Fourier decomposition, exponential smoothing, and seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) models do not reflect the distinct characteristics of each period in seasonal patterns, such as the unique behavior of specific days of the week in business data. We propose a multi-dimensional hierarchical model. Intermediate parameters for each seasonal period are first estimated, and a mixture of intermediate parameters is then taken, resulting in a model that successfully reflects the interactions between multiple seasonal patterns. Although this process reduces the data available for each parameter, a robust estimation can be obtained through a hierarchical Bayesian model implemented in Stan. Through this model, it becomes possible to consider both the characteristics of each seasonal period and the interactions among characteristics from multiple seasonal periods. Our new model achieved considerable improvements in prediction accuracy compared to previous models, including Fourier decomposition, which Prophet uses to model seasonality patterns. A comparison was performed on a real-world dataset of pallet transport from a national-scale logistic network.


Recurrent Neural Networks for Time Series Forecasting: Current Status and Future Directions

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN) have become competitive forecasting methods, as most notably shown in the winning method of the recent M4 competition. However, established statistical models such as ETS and ARIMA gain their popularity not only from their high accuracy, but they are also suitable for non-expert users as they are robust, efficient, and automatic. In these areas, RNNs have still a long way to go. We present an extensive empirical study and an open-source software framework of existing RNN architectures for forecasting, that allow us to develop guidelines and best practices for their use. For example, we conclude that RNNs are capable of modelling seasonality directly if the series in the dataset possess homogeneous seasonal patterns, otherwise we recommend a deseasonalization step. Comparisons against ETS and ARIMA demonstrate that the implemented (semi-)automatic RNN models are no silver bullets, but they are competitive alternatives in many situations.