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Towards a Computational Model of Why Some Students Learn Faster than Others

AAAI Conferences

Learners that have better metacognition acquire knowledge faster than others who do not. If we had better models of such learning, we would be able to build a better metacognitive educational system. In this paper, we propose a computational model that uses a probabilistic context free grammar induction algorithm yielding metacognitive learning by acquiring deep features to assist future learning. We discuss the challenges of integrating this model into a synthetic student, and possible future studies in using this model to better understand human learning. Preliminary results suggest that both stronger prior knowledge and a better learning strategy can speed up the learning process. Some model variations generate human-like error pattern.


Learning Cognitive Models using Neural Networks

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A cognitive model of human learning provides information about skills a learner must acquire to perform accurately in a task domain. Cognitive models of learning are not only of scientific interest, but are also valuable in adaptive online tutoring systems. A more accurate model yields more effective tutoring through better instructional decisions. Prior methods of automated cognitive model discovery have typically focused on well-structured domains, relied on student performance data or involved substantial human knowledge engineering. In this paper, we propose Cognitive Representation Learner (CogRL), a novel framework to learn accurate cognitive models in ill-structured domains with no data and little to no human knowledge engineering. Our contribution is two-fold: firstly, we show that representations learnt using CogRL can be used for accurate automatic cognitive model discovery without using any student performance data in several ill-structured domains: Rumble Blocks, Chinese Character, and Article Selection. This is especially effective and useful in domains where an accurate human-authored cognitive model is unavailable or authoring a cognitive model is difficult. Secondly, for domains where a cognitive model is available, we show that representations learned through CogRL can be used to get accurate estimates of skill difficulty and learning rate parameters without using any student performance data. These estimates are shown to highly correlate with estimates using student performance data on an Article Selection dataset.


New Potentials for Data-Driven Intelligent Tutoring System Development and Optimization

AI Magazine

Such data can be used to help advance our understanding of student learning and enable more intelligent, interactive, engaging, and effective education. In this article, we discuss the status and prospects of this new and powerful opportunity for datadriven development and optimization of educational technologies, focusing on intelligent tutoring systems. We provide examples of use of a variety of techniques to develop or optimize the select, evaluate, suggest, and update functions of intelligent tutors, including probabilistic grammar learning, rule induction, Markov decision process, classification, and integrations of symbolic search and statistical inference. AI methods have advanced considerably since those early days, and so have intelligent tutoring systems. Today, intelligent tutoring systems are in widespread use in K-12 schools and colleges and are enhancing the student learning experience (for example, Graesser et al. [2005]; Mitrovic [2003]; VanLehn [2006]).


New Potentials for Data-Driven Intelligent Tutoring System Development and Optimization

AI Magazine

Increasing widespread use of educational technologies is producing vast amounts of data. Such data can be used to help advance our understanding of student learning and enable more intelligent, interactive, engaging, and effective education. In this article, we discuss the status and prospects of this new and powerful opportunity for data-driven development and optimization of educational technologies, focusing on intelligent tutoring systems We provide examples of use of a variety of techniques to develop or optimize the select, evaluate, suggest, and update functions of intelligent tutors, including probabilistic grammar learning, rule induction, Markov decision process, classification, and integrations of symbolic search and statistical inference.


Integrating Transfer Learning in Synthetic Student

AAAI Conferences

Building an intelligent agent, which simulates human-level learning appropriate for learning math, science, or a second language, could potentially benefit both education in understanding human learning, and artificial intelligence in creating human-level intelligence. Recently, we have proposed an efficient approach to acquiring procedural knowledge using transfer learning. However, it operated as a separate module. In this paper, we describe how to integrate this module into a machine-learning agent, SimStudent, that learns procedural knowledge from examples and through problem solving. We illustrate this method in the domain of algebra, after which we consider directions for future research in this area.