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This giant puzzle of a CMYK gradient may be the hardest we've ever seen

Mashable

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission. For some, jigsaw puzzles are a slow, relaxing pastime that exercise the creative and logic centers of the mind. If you're one of the former, it's time you experienced Clemens Habicht's 1,000 Colours. This is no ordinary jigsaw puzzle -- because of the subtle changes in color, it's a true test of patience, process, and attention to detail that's not for the faint of heart (or the faint of sight). You won't have the luxury of a real-world image to focus on while you try to match the picture on the box to the jumble of pieces in front of you.


Lazy caterer jigsaw puzzles: Models, properties, and a mechanical system-based solver

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Jigsaw puzzle solving, the problem of constructing a coherent whole from a set of non-overlapping unordered fragments, is fundamental to numerous applications, and yet most of the literature has focused thus far on less realistic puzzles whose pieces are identical squares. Here we formalize a new type of jigsaw puzzle where the pieces are general convex polygons generated by cutting through a global polygonal shape with an arbitrary number of straight cuts, a generation model inspired by the celebrated Lazy caterer's sequence. We analyze the theoretical properties of such puzzles, including the inherent challenges in solving them once pieces are contaminated with geometrical noise. To cope with such difficulties and obtain tractable solutions, we abstract the problem as a multi-body spring-mass dynamical system endowed with hierarchical loop constraints and a layered reconstruction process. We define evaluation metrics and present experimental results to indicate that such puzzles are solvable completely automatically.


You Could Play This Jigsaw Puzzle Forever and Never Finish

WIRED

The joy of any good jigsaw puzzle isn't finishing it, it's the satisfaction of linking pieces, one fit at a time. With the Infinite Galaxy Puzzle, which you can assemble in any direction and in countless shapes, that sensation need never end. Granted, that lack of resolution may make you crazy. But it makes the Infinite Galaxy Puzzle from Nervous System a unique contribution to the cannon. You'd expect nothing less from its creators, who have spent "five or six" years making jigsaw puzzles.


Generating Music Medleys via Playing Music Puzzle Games

AAAI Conferences

Generating music medleys is about finding an optimal permutation of a given set of music clips. Toward this goal, we propose a self-supervised learning task, called the music puzzle game, to train neural network models to learn the sequential patterns in music. In essence, such a game requires machines to correctly sort a few multisecond music fragments. In the training stage, we learn the model by sampling multiple non-overlapping fragment pairs from the same songs and seeking to predict whether a given pair is consecutive and is in the correct chronological order. For testing, we design a number of puzzle games with different difficulty levels, the most difficult one being music medley, which requiring sorting fragments from different songs. On the basis of state-of-the-art Siamese convolutional network, we propose an improved architecture that learns to embed frame-level similarity scores computed from the input fragment pairs to a common space, where fragment pairs in the correct order can be more easily identified. Our result shows that the resulting model, dubbed as the similarity embedding network (SEN), performs better than competing models across different games, including music jigsaw puzzle, music sequencing, and music medley. Example results can be found at our project website, https://remyhuang.github.io/DJnet.


A Novel Hybrid Scheme Using Genetic Algorithms and Deep Learning for the Reconstruction of Portuguese Tile Panels

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This paper presents a novel scheme, based on a unique combination of genetic algorithms (GAs) and deep learning (DL), for the automatic reconstruction of Portuguese tile panels, a challenging real-world variant of the jigsaw puzzle problem (JPP) with important national heritage implications. Specifically, we introduce an enhanced GA-based puzzle solver, whose integration with a novel DL-based compatibility measure (DLCM) yields state-of-the-art performance, regarding the above application. Current compatibility measures consider typically (the chromatic information of) edge pixels (between adjacent tiles), and help achieve high accuracy for the synthetic JPP variant. However, such measures exhibit rather poor performance when applied to the Portuguese tile panels, which are susceptible to various real-world effects, e.g., monochromatic panels, non-squared tiles, edge degradation, etc. To overcome such difficulties, we have developed a novel DLCM to extract high-level texture/color statistics from the entire tile information. Integrating this measure with our enhanced GA-based puzzle solver, we have demonstrated, for the first time, how to deal most effectively with large-scale real-world problems, such as the Portuguese tile problem. Specifically, we have achieved 82% accuracy for the reconstruction of Portuguese tile panels with unknown piece rotation and puzzle dimension (compared to merely 3.5% average accuracy achieved by the best method known for solving this problem variant). The proposed method outperforms even human experts in several cases, correcting their mistakes in the manual tile assembly.