Flexible Models for Microclustering with Application to Entity Resolution

Neural Information Processing Systems

Most generative models for clustering implicitly assume that the number of data points in each cluster grows linearly with the total number of data points. Finite mixture models, Dirichlet process mixture models, and Pitman-Yor process mixture models make this assumption, as do all other infinitely exchangeable clustering models. However, for some applications, this assumption is inappropriate. For example, when performing entity resolution, the size of each cluster should be unrelated to the size of the data set, and each cluster should contain a negligible fraction of the total number of data points. These applications require models that yield clusters whose sizes grow sublinearly with the size of the data set. We address this requirement by defining the microclustering property and introducing a new class of models that can exhibit this property. We compare models within this class to two commonly used clustering models using four entity-resolution data sets.


Cross-lingual Propagation for Morphological Analysis

AAAI Conferences

Multilingual parallel text corpora provide a powerful means for propagating linguistic knowledge across languages. We present a model which jointly learns linguistic structure for each language while inducing links between them. Our model supports fully symmetrical knowledge transfer, utilizing any combination of supervised and unsupervised data across language barriers. The proposed nonparametric Bayesian model effectively combines cross-lingual alignment with target language predictions. This architecture is a potent alternative to projection methods which decompose these decisions into two separate stages. We apply this approach to the task of morphological segmentation, where the goal is to separate a word into its individual morphemes. When tested on a parallel corpus of Hebrew and Arabic, our joint bilingual model effectively incorporates all available evidence from both languages, yielding significant performance gains.


Query Expansion in Information Retrieval Systems using a Bayesian Network-Based Thesaurus

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Information Retrieval (IR) is concerned with the identification of documents in a collection that are relevant to a given information need, usually represented as a query containing terms or keywords, which are supposed to be a good description of what the user is looking for. IR systems may improve their effectiveness (i.e., increasing the number of relevant documents retrieved) by using a process of query expansion, which automatically adds new terms to the original query posed by an user. In this paper we develop a method of query expansion based on Bayesian networks. Using a learning algorithm, we construct a Bayesian network that represents some of the relationships among the terms appearing in a given document collection; this network is then used as a thesaurus (specific for that collection). We also report the results obtained by our method on three standard test collections.


Latent Dirichlet Allocation Using Gibbs Sampling

#artificialintelligence

Text clustering is a widely used techniques to automatically draw out patterns from a set of documents. This notion can be extended to customer segmentation in the digital marketing field. As one of its main core is to understand what drives visitors to come, leave and behave on site. One simple way to do this is by reviewing words that they used to arrive on site and what words they used ( what things they searched) once they're on your site. Another usage of text clustering is for document organization or indexing (tagging).


Provable Algorithms for Inference in Topic Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recently, there has been considerable progress on designing algorithms with provable guarantees -- typically using linear algebraic methods -- for parameter learning in latent variable models. But designing provable algorithms for inference has proven to be more challenging. Here we take a first step towards provable inference in topic models. We leverage a property of topic models that enables us to construct simple linear estimators for the unknown topic proportions that have small variance, and consequently can work with short documents. Our estimators also correspond to finding an estimate around which the posterior is well-concentrated. We show lower bounds that for shorter documents it can be information theoretically impossible to find the hidden topics. Finally, we give empirical results that demonstrate that our algorithm works on realistic topic models. It yields good solutions on synthetic data and runs in time comparable to a {\em single} iteration of Gibbs sampling.