Hyperparameter Optimization: A Spectral Approach

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We give a simple, fast algorithm for hyperparameter optimization inspired by techniques from the analysis of Boolean functions. We focus on the high-dimensional regime where the canonical example is training a neural network with a large number of hyperparameters. The algorithm --- an iterative application of compressed sensing techniques for orthogonal polynomials --- requires only uniform sampling of the hyperparameters and is thus easily parallelizable. Experiments for training deep neural networks on Cifar-10 show that compared to state-of-the-art tools (e.g., Hyperband and Spearmint), our algorithm finds significantly improved solutions, in some cases better than what is attainable by hand-tuning. In terms of overall running time (i.e., time required to sample various settings of hyperparameters plus additional computation time), we are at least an order of magnitude faster than Hyperband and Bayesian Optimization. We also outperform Random Search 8x. Additionally, our method comes with provable guarantees and yields the first improvements on the sample complexity of learning decision trees in over two decades. In particular, we obtain the first quasi-polynomial time algorithm for learning noisy decision trees with polynomial sample complexity.


BOHB: Robust and Efficient Hyperparameter Optimization at Scale

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Modern deep learning methods are very sensitive to many hyperparameters, and, due to the long training times of state-of-the-art models, vanilla Bayesian hyperparameter optimization is typically computationally infeasible. On the other hand, bandit-based configuration evaluation approaches based on random search lack guidance and do not converge to the best configurations as quickly. Here, we propose to combine the benefits of both Bayesian optimization and bandit-based methods, in order to achieve the best of both worlds: strong anytime performance and fast convergence to optimal configurations. We propose a new practical state-of-the-art hyperparameter optimization method, which consistently outperforms both Bayesian optimization and Hyperband on a wide range of problem types, including high-dimensional toy functions, support vector machines, feed-forward neural networks, Bayesian neural networks, deep reinforcement learning, and convolutional neural networks. Our method is robust and versatile, while at the same time being conceptually simple and easy to implement.


Hyperband: A Novel Bandit-Based Approach to Hyperparameter Optimization

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Performance of machine learning algorithms depends critically on identifying a good set of hyperparameters. While current methods offer efficiencies by adaptively choosing new configurations to train, an alternative strategy is to adaptively allocate resources across the selected configurations. We formulate hyperparameter optimization as a pure-exploration non-stochastic infinitely many armed bandit problem where a predefined resource like iterations, data samples, or features is allocated to randomly sampled configurations. We introduce Hyperband for this framework and analyze its theoretical properties, providing several desirable guarantees. Furthermore, we compare Hyperband with state-of-the-art methods on a suite of hyperparameter optimization problems. We observe that Hyperband provides five times to thirty times speedup over state-of-the-art Bayesian optimization algorithms on a variety of deep-learning and kernel-based learning problems.


Hyperband demo by kgjamieson

@machinelearnbot

The hyperparamter optimization literature in recent years has been dominated by hyperparameter selection algorithms (e.g. Bayesian Optimization) that attempt to improve upon grid/random search. However, recent evidence on a benchmark of over a hundred hyperparameter optimization datasets suggests that such enthusiasm may call for increased scrutiny. Rank plots aggregate statistics across datasets for different methods as a function of time: first place gets one point, second place two points, and so forth. The plot, reproduced from that work, is the average score across 117 datasets collected by Feurer et.


Towards Automated Deep Learning: Efficient Joint Neural Architecture and Hyperparameter Search

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

While existing work on neural architecture search (NAS) tunes hyperparameters in a separate post-processing step, we demonstrate that architectural choices and other hyperparameter settings interact in a way that can render this separation suboptimal. Likewise, we demonstrate that the common practice of using very few epochs during the main NAS and much larger numbers of epochs during a post-processing step is inefficient due to little correlation in the relative rankings for these two training regimes. To combat both of these problems, we propose to use a recent combination of Bayesian optimization and Hyperband for efficient joint neural architecture and hyperparameter search.