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The end is nigh! A killer robot has been taught how to hunt predators

#artificialintelligence

Scientists have taught a robot how to hunt and destroy prey in a chilling new experiment. The test comes as experts warm AI could wipe out a tenth of the global population in five years. The ability to identify and zone in on a specific target will be crucial for any useful robotic technology like driverless cars, the researchers at the University of Zurich in Switzerland believe. And despite the chilling prospect of allowing a robot to mark up a target, they believe their research will prove more useful than deadly. Scientists have taught a robot how to hunt and destroy prey in a chilling new experiment.


The end is nigh! A killer robot has been taught how to hunt predators

AITopics Original Links

Scientists have taught a robot how to hunt and destroy prey in a chilling new experiment. The test comes as experts warm AI could wipe out a tenth of the global population in five years. The ability to identify and zone in on a specific target will be crucial for any useful robotic technology like driverless cars, the researchers at the University of Zurich in Switzerland believe. And despite the chilling prospect of allowing a robot to mark up a target, they believe their research will prove more useful than deadly. Scientists have taught a robot how to hunt and destroy prey in a chilling new experiment.


Brain-computer-interface training helps tetraplegics win avatar race

@machinelearnbot

Noninvasive brain–computer interface (BCI) systems can restore functions lost to disability -- allowing for spontaneous, direct brain control of external devices without the risks associated with surgical implantation of neural interfaces. But as machine-learning algorithms have become faster and more powerful, researchers have mostly focused on increasing performance by optimizing pattern-recognition algorithms. But what about letting patients actively participate with AI in improving performance? To test that idea, researchers at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), based in Geneva, Switzerland, conducted research using "mutual learning" between computer and humans -- two severely impaired (tetraplegic) participants with chronic spinal cord injury. The goal: win a live virtual racing game at an international event.


Semantic Understanding of Foggy Scenes with Purely Synthetic Data

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

-- This work addresses the problem of semantic scene understanding under foggy road conditions. Although marked progress has been made in semantic scene understanding over the recent years, it is mainly concentrated on clear weather outdoor scenes. Extending semantic segmentation methods to adverse weather conditions like fog is crucially important for outdoor applications such as self-driving cars. In this paper, we propose a novel method, which uses purely synthetic data to improve the performance on unseen real-world foggy scenes captured in the streets of Zurich and its surroundings. Our results highlight the potential and power of photo-realistic synthetic images for training and especially fine-tuning deep neural nets. Our contributions are threefold, 1) we created a purely synthetic, high-quality foggy dataset of 25,000 unique outdoor scenes, that we call Foggy Synscapes and plan to release publicly 2) we show that with this data we outperform previous approaches on real-world foggy test data 3) we show that a combination of our data and previously used data can even further improve the performance on real-world foggy data. The last years have seen tremendous progress in tasks relevant to autonomous driving [1].


Udacity announces 'flying car' nanodegree, new partnership with Lyft

ZDNet

The online education company Udacity on Tuesday unveiled a "flying car" nanodegree program, offering students "the skills to create autonomous flight vehicles that will be crucial to the transportation systems of the future." Driven to distraction: Why IBM's Watson is getting onboard with self-driving vehicles and impatient passengers IBM has teamed up with Local Motors for a new autonomous vehicle. Here's how it will handle difficult passengers - and why you won't be able to buy one. The two-term program will open in early 2018, with a curriculum designed by aerospace and autonomous systems experts, including Nicholas Roy, the MIT Aeronautics professor and founder of Alphabet's Project Wing; Raffaelo D'Andrea, ETH Zurich professor and co-founder of Kiva Systems; Angela Schoellig, University of Toronto Institute Aerospace professor; and Udacity founder Sebastian Thrun. "Our goal is to teach a new generation of engineers the skills necessary to build this smart transportation future," Roy wrote in a blog post.