The end is nigh! A killer robot has been taught how to hunt predators

AITopics Original Links

Scientists have taught a robot how to hunt and destroy prey in a chilling new experiment. The test comes as experts warm AI could wipe out a tenth of the global population in five years. The ability to identify and zone in on a specific target will be crucial for any useful robotic technology like driverless cars, the researchers at the University of Zurich in Switzerland believe. And despite the chilling prospect of allowing a robot to mark up a target, they believe their research will prove more useful than deadly. Scientists have taught a robot how to hunt and destroy prey in a chilling new experiment.


The end is nigh! A killer robot has been taught how to hunt predators

#artificialintelligence

Scientists have taught a robot how to hunt and destroy prey in a chilling new experiment. The test comes as experts warm AI could wipe out a tenth of the global population in five years. The ability to identify and zone in on a specific target will be crucial for any useful robotic technology like driverless cars, the researchers at the University of Zurich in Switzerland believe. And despite the chilling prospect of allowing a robot to mark up a target, they believe their research will prove more useful than deadly. Scientists have taught a robot how to hunt and destroy prey in a chilling new experiment.


Udacity announces 'flying car' nanodegree, new partnership with Lyft

ZDNet

The online education company Udacity on Tuesday unveiled a "flying car" nanodegree program, offering students "the skills to create autonomous flight vehicles that will be crucial to the transportation systems of the future." Driven to distraction: Why IBM's Watson is getting onboard with self-driving vehicles and impatient passengers IBM has teamed up with Local Motors for a new autonomous vehicle. Here's how it will handle difficult passengers - and why you won't be able to buy one. The two-term program will open in early 2018, with a curriculum designed by aerospace and autonomous systems experts, including Nicholas Roy, the MIT Aeronautics professor and founder of Alphabet's Project Wing; Raffaelo D'Andrea, ETH Zurich professor and co-founder of Kiva Systems; Angela Schoellig, University of Toronto Institute Aerospace professor; and Udacity founder Sebastian Thrun. "Our goal is to teach a new generation of engineers the skills necessary to build this smart transportation future," Roy wrote in a blog post.


Miniature motorcycle designed by French student can reach up to 40mph

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It could easily be mistaken for a children's toy, but this miniature motorcycle is actually a step towards a riderless motorbike. A student in France has designed the tiny two-wheeler, which can travel at up to 40 miles per hour, as part of his Master's project. His aim is to one day produce an entirely autonomous motorcycle that can outperform human riders. Eric Unnervik, a microengineer at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in France has designed a tiny two-wheeler (pictured(, which can travel at up to 40 mph, as part of his Master's project. The bike is fitted with a tiny credit-card sized computer, called the Raspberry Pi, as well as sensors that measure the angle and speed of travel.


Drone Deliveries Advance With $16M Boeing-Led Investment

Forbes - Tech

The autonomous drone logistics platform Matternet has raised $16 million in a Series A funding round led by Boeing Horizon X Ventures, with investments by Swiss Post, Sony Innovation Fund and Levitate Capital. The funding is a vote of confidence in what many already believe will be a standard feature of our lives in the near future. Matternet has launched drone deliveries in the healthcare sector, with a successful program in Lugano, Switzerland, in partnership with Swiss Post and Mercedes-Benz Vans. It has conducted more than 1,700 flights for the Ticino EOC Hospital Group and delivered over 850 patient samples over densely populated areas without incident. This month, Matternet and Swiss Post expanded the operation to test new hospital-to-hospital networks in Bern and Zurich.