Neural Educational Recommendation Engine (NERE)

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Quizlet is the most popular online learning tool in the United States, and is used by over 2/3 of high school students, and 1/2 of college students. With more than 95% of Quizlet users reporting improved grades as a result, the platform has become the de-facto tool used in millions of classrooms. In this paper, we explore the task of recommending suitable content for a student to study, given their prior interests, as well as what their peers are studying. We propose a novel approach, i.e. Neural Educational Recommendation Engine (NERE), to recommend educational content by leveraging student behaviors rather than ratings. We have found that this approach better captures social factors that are more aligned with learning. NERE is based on a recurrent neural network that includes collaborative and content-based approaches for recommendation, and takes into account any particular student's speed, mastery, and experience to recommend the appropriate task. We train NERE by jointly learning the user embeddings and content embeddings, and attempt to predict the content embedding for the final timestamp. We also develop a confidence estimator for our neural network, which is a crucial requirement for productionizing this model. We apply NERE to Quizlet's proprietary dataset, and present our results. We achieved an R^2 score of 0.81 in the content embedding space, and a recall score of 54% on our 100 nearest neighbors. This vastly exceeds the recall@100 score of 12% that a standard matrix-factorization approach provides. We conclude with a discussion on how NERE will be deployed, and position our work as one of the first educational recommender systems for the K-12 space.


AI Nanodegree Program Syllabus: Term 2 (Deep Learning), In Depth

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Here at Udacity, we are tremendously excited to announce the kick-off of the second term of our Artificial Intelligence Nanodegree program. Because we are able to provide a depth of education that is commensurate with university education; because we are bridging the gap between universities and industry by providing you with hands-on projects and partnering with the top industries in the field; and last but certainly not least, because we are able to bring this education to many more people across the globe, at a cost that makes a top-notch AI education realistic for all aspiring learners. During the first term, you've enjoyed learning about Game Playing Agents, Simulated Annealing, Constraint Satisfaction, Logic and Planning, and Probabilistic AI from some of the biggest names in the field: Sebastian Thrun, Peter Norvig, and Thad Starner. Term 2 will be focused on one of the cutting-edge advancements of AI -- Deep Learning. In this Term, you will learn about the foundations of neural networks, understand how to train these neural networks with techniques such as gradient descent and backpropagation, and learn different types of architectures that make neural networks work for a variety of different applications.


Coursera Coupons Min 10% off 100% Free Courses Student Offer

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Learn Machine Learning Stanford University Professor and earn certification to full proof your career. Machine learning is the science of getting computers to act without being explicitly programmed. In the past decade, machine learning has given us self-driving cars, practical speech recognition, effective web search, and a vastly improved understanding of the human genome. Machine learning is so pervasive today that you probably use it dozens of times a day without knowing it. Many researchers also think it is the best way to make progress towards human-level AI.


The 7 Best Data Science and Machine Learning Podcasts

@machinelearnbot

Data science and machine learning have long been interests of mine, but now that I'm working on Fuzzy.ai and trying to make AI and machine learning accessible to all developers, I need to keep on top of all the news in both fields. My preferred way to do this is through listening to podcasts. I've listened to a bunch of machine learning and data science podcasts in the last few months, so I thought I'd share my favorites: Every other week, they release a 10–15 minute episode where hosts, Kyle and Linda Polich give a short primer on topics like k-means clustering, natural language processing and decision tree learning, often using analogies related to their pet parrot, Yoshi. This is the only place where you'll learn about k-means clustering via placement of parrot droppings. Hosted by Katie Malone and Ben Jaffe of online education startup Udacity, this weekly podcast covers diverse topics in data science and machine learning: teaching specific concepts like Hidden Markov Models and how they apply to real-world problems and datasets.


IBM Watson's new job: third grade math teacher advisor • LiketheFuture

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IBM's famous AI system has accomplished many, many things these past years, from making movie trailers to saving a person's life. Now, it's also helping teachers make lesson plans by powering Teacher Advisor, a program IBM developed with the American Federation of Teachers. If you're thinking "How hard could a grade school lesson plan be?" Well, have you seen Common Core mathematics? It's not the same math from back in the day, and teachers who didn't grow up with it might have a tough time conjuring up a way to make it more understandable.