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Stop explaining black box machine learning models for high stakes decisions and use interpretable models instead - KDnuggets

#artificialintelligence

Stop explaining black box machine learning models for high stakes decisions and use interpretable models instead Rudin et al., arXiv 2019 It's pretty clear from the title alone what Cynthia Rudin would like us to do! The paper is a mix of technical and philosophical arguments and comes with two main takeaways for me: firstly, a sharpening of my understanding of the difference between explainability and interpretability, and why the former may be problematic; and secondly some great pointers to techniques for creating truly interpretable models. A model can be a black box for one of two reasons: (a) the function that the model computes is far too complicated for any human to comprehend, or (b) the model may in actual fact be simple, but its details are proprietary and not available for inspection. In explainable ML we make predictions using a complicated black box model (e.g., a DNN), and use a second (posthoc) model created to explain what the first model is doing. A classic example here is LIME, which explores a local area of a complex model to uncover decision boundaries.


Stop explaining black box machine learning models for high stakes decisions and use interpretable models instead

#artificialintelligence

Stop explaining black box machine learning models for high stakes decisions and use interpretable models instead Rudin et al., arXiv 2019 It's pretty clear from the title alone what Cynthia Rudin would like us to do! The paper is a mix of technical and philosophical arguments and comes with two main takeaways for me: firstly, a sharpening of my understanding of the difference between explainability and interpretability, and why the former may be problematic; and secondly some great pointers to techniques for creating truly interpretable models. A model can be a black box for one of two reasons: (a) the function that the model computes is far too complicated for any human to comprehend, or (b) the model may in actual fact be simple, but its details are proprietary and not available for inspection. In explainable ML we make predictions using a complicated black box model (e.g., a DNN), and use a second (posthoc) model created to explain what the first model is doing. A classic example here is LIME, which explores a local area of a complex model to uncover decision boundaries.


Navigating the Sea of Explainability - WebSystemer.no

#artificialintelligence

This article is coauthored by Joy Rimchala and Shir Meir Lador. Rapid adoption of complex machine learning (ML) models in recent years has brought with it a new challenge for today's companies: how to interpret, understand, and explain the reasoning behind these complex models' predictions. Treating complex ML systems as trustworthy black boxes without sanity checking has led to some disastrous outcomes, as evidenced by recent disclosures of gender and racial biases in GenderShades¹. As ML-assisted predictions integrate more deeply into high-stakes decision-making, such as medical diagnoses, recidivism risk prediction, loan approval processes, etc., knowing the root causes of an ML prediction becomes crucial. If we know that certain model predictions reflect bias and are not aligned with our best knowledge and societal values (such as an equal opportunity policy or outcome equity), we can detect these undesirable ML defects, prevent the deployment of such ML systems, and correct model defects.


Learning Fair Rule Lists

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The widespread use of machine learning models, especially within the context of decision-making systems impacting individuals, raises many ethical issues with respect to fairness and interpretability of these models. While the research in these domains is booming, very few works have addressed these two issues simultaneously. To solve this shortcoming, we propose FairCORELS, a supervised learning algorithm whose objective is to learn at the same time fair and interpretable models. FairCORELS is a multi-objective variant of CORELS, a branch-and-bound algorithm, designed to compute accurate and interpretable rule lists. By jointly addressing fairness and interpretability, FairCORELS can achieve better fairness/accuracy tradeoffs compared to existing methods, as demonstrated by the empirical evaluation performed on real datasets. Our paper also contains additional contributions regarding the search strategies for optimizing the multi-objective function integrating both fairness, accuracy and interpretability.


Fairwashing: the risk of rationalization

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Black-box explanation is the problem of explaining how a machine learning model -- whose internal logic is hidden to the auditor and generally complex -- produces its outcomes. Current approaches for solving this problem include model explanation, outcome explanation as well as model inspection. While these techniques can be beneficial by providing interpretability, they can be used in a negative manner to perform fairwashing, which we define as promoting the perception that a machine learning model respects some ethical values while it might not be the case. In particular, we demonstrate that it is possible to systematically rationalize decisions taken by an unfair black-box model using the model explanation as well as the outcome explanation approaches with a given fairness metric. Our solution, LaundryML, is based on a regularized rule list enumeration algorithm whose objective is to search for fair rule lists approximating an unfair black-box model. We empirically evaluate our rationalization technique on black-box models trained on real-world datasets and show that one can obtain rule lists with high fidelity to the black-box model while being considerably less unfair at the same time.