Goto

Collaborating Authors

Way Off-Policy Batch Deep Reinforcement Learning of Implicit Human Preferences in Dialog

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Most deep reinforcement learning (RL) systems are not able to learn effectively from off-policy data, especially if they cannot explore online in the environment. These are critical shortcomings for applying RL to real-world problems where collecting data is expensive, and models must be tested offline before being deployed to interact with the environment -- e.g. systems that learn from human interaction. Thus, we develop a novel class of off-policy batch RL algorithms, which are able to effectively learn offline, without exploring, from a fixed batch of human interaction data. We leverage models pre-trained on data as a strong prior, and use KL-control to penalize divergence from this prior during RL training. We also use dropout-based uncertainty estimates to lower bound the target Q-values as a more efficient alternative to Double Q-Learning. The algorithms are tested on the problem of open-domain dialog generation -- a challenging reinforcement learning problem with a 20,000-dimensional action space. Using our Way Off-Policy algorithm, we can extract multiple different reward functions post-hoc from collected human interaction data, and learn effectively from all of these. We test the real-world generalization of these systems by deploying them live to converse with humans in an open-domain setting, and demonstrate that our algorithm achieves significant improvements over prior methods in off-policy batch RL.


Approximating Interactive Human Evaluation with Self-Play for Open-Domain Dialog Systems

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Building an open-domain conversational agent is a challenging problem. Current evaluation methods, mostly post-hoc judgments of single-turn evaluation, do not capture conversation quality in a realistic interactive context. In this paper, we investigate interactive human evaluation and provide evidence for its necessity; we then introduce a novel, model-agnostic, and dataset-agnostic method to approximate it. In particular, we propose a self-play scenario where the dialog system talks to itself and we calculate a combination of proxies such as sentiment and semantic coherence on the conversation trajectory. We show that this metric is capable of capturing the human-rated quality of a dialog model better than any automated metric known to-date, achieving a significant Pearson correlation (r>.7, p<.05). To investigate the strengths of this novel metric and interactive evaluation in comparison to state-of-the-art metrics and one-turn evaluation, we perform extended experiments with a set of models, including several that make novel improvements to recent hierarchical dialog generation architectures through sentiment and semantic knowledge distillation on the utterance level. Finally, we open-source the interactive evaluation platform we built and the dataset we collected to allow researchers to efficiently deploy and evaluate generative dialog models.


Towards Coherent and Engaging Spoken Dialog Response Generation Using Automatic Conversation Evaluators

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Encoder-decoder based neural architectures serve as the basis of state-of-the-art approaches in end-to-end open domain dialog systems. Since most of such systems are trained with a maximum likelihood(MLE) objective they suffer from issues such as lack of generalizability and the generic response problem, i.e., a system response that can be an answer to a large number of user utterances, e.g., "Maybe, I don't know." Having explicit feedback on the relevance and interestingness of a system response at each turn can be a useful signal for mitigating such issues and improving system quality by selecting responses from different approaches. Towards this goal, we present a system that evaluates chatbot responses at each dialog turn for coherence and engagement. Our system provides explicit turn-level dialog quality feedback, which we show to be highly correlated with human evaluation. To show that incorporating this feedback in the neural response generation models improves dialog quality, we present two different and complementary mechanisms to incorporate explicit feedback into a neural response generation model: reranking and direct modification of the loss function during training. Our studies show that a response generation model that incorporates these combined feedback mechanisms produce more engaging and coherent responses in an open-domain spoken dialog setting, significantly improving the response quality using both automatic and human evaluation.


Recent Advances in Deep Learning-based Dialogue Systems

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Dialogue systems are a popular Natural Language Processing (NLP) task as it is promising in real-life applications. It is also a complicated task since many NLP tasks deserving study are involved. As a result, a multitude of novel works on this task are carried out, and most of them are deep learning-based due to the outstanding performance. In this survey, we mainly focus on the deep learning-based dialogue systems. We comprehensively review state-of-the-art research outcomes in dialogue systems and analyze them from two angles: model type and system type. Specifically, from the angle of model type, we discuss the principles, characteristics, and applications of different models that are widely used in dialogue systems. This will help researchers acquaint these models and see how they are applied in state-of-the-art frameworks, which is rather helpful when designing a new dialogue system. From the angle of system type, we discuss task-oriented and open-domain dialogue systems as two streams of research, providing insight into the hot topics related. Furthermore, we comprehensively review the evaluation methods and datasets for dialogue systems to pave the way for future research. Finally, some possible research trends are identified based on the recent research outcomes. To the best of our knowledge, this survey is the most comprehensive and up-to-date one at present in the area of dialogue systems and dialogue-related tasks, extensively covering the popular frameworks, topics, and datasets. Keywords: Dialogue Systems, Chatbots, Conversational AI, Task-oriented, Open Domain, Chit-chat, Question Answering, Artificial Intelligence, Natural Language Processing, Information Retrieval, Deep Learning, Neural Networks, CNN, RNN, Hierarchical Recurrent Encoder-Decoder, Memory Networks, Attention, Transformer, Pointer Net, CopyNet, Reinforcement Learning, GANs, Knowledge Graph, Survey, Review


Which Kind Is Better in Open-domain Multi-turn Dialog,Hierarchical or Non-hierarchical Models? An Empirical Study

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Currently, open-domain generative dialog systems have attracted considerable attention in academia and industry. Despite the success of single-turn dialog generation, multi-turn dialog generation is still a big challenge. So far, there are two kinds of models for open-domain multi-turn dialog generation: hierarchical and non-hierarchical models. Recently, some works have shown that the hierarchical models are better than non-hierarchical models under their experimental settings; meanwhile, some works also demonstrate the opposite conclusion. Due to the lack of adequate comparisons, it's not clear which kind of models are better in open-domain multi-turn dialog generation. Thus, in this paper, we will measure systematically nearly all representative hierarchical and non-hierarchical models over the same experimental settings to check which kind is better. Through extensive experiments, we have the following three important conclusions: (1) Nearly all hierarchical models are worse than non-hierarchical models in open-domain multi-turn dialog generation, except for the HRAN model. Through further analysis, the excellent performance of HRAN mainly depends on its word-level attention mechanism; (2) The performance of other hierarchical models will also obtain a great improvement if integrating the word-level attention mechanism into these models. The modified hierarchical models even significantly outperform the non-hierarchical models; (3) The reason why the word-level attention mechanism is so powerful for hierarchical models is because it can leverage context information more effectively, especially the fine-grained information. Besides, we have implemented all of the models and already released the codes.