Train and Test Tightness of LP Relaxations in Structured Prediction

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Structured prediction is used in areas such as computer vision and natural language processing to predict structured outputs such as segmentations or parse trees. In these settings, prediction is performed by MAP inference or, equivalently, by solving an integer linear program. Because of the complex scoring functions required to obtain accurate predictions, both learning and inference typically require the use of approximate solvers. We propose a theoretical explanation to the striking observation that approximations based on linear programming (LP) relaxations are often tight on real-world instances. In particular, we show that learning with LP relaxed inference encourages integrality of training instances, and that tightness generalizes from train to test data.


More data means less inference: A pseudo-max approach to structured learning

Neural Information Processing Systems

The problem of learning to predict structured labels is of key importance in many applications. However, for general graph structure both learning and inference in this setting are intractable. Here we show that it is possible to circumvent this difficulty when the input distribution is rich enough via a method similar in spirit to pseudo-likelihood. We show how our new method achieves consistency, and illustrate empirically that it indeed performs as well as exact methods when sufficiently large training sets are used.


Deep Structured Prediction with Nonlinear Output Transformations

Neural Information Processing Systems

Deep structured models are widely used for tasks like semantic segmentation, where explicit correlations between variables provide important prior information which generally helps to reduce the data needs of deep nets. However, current deep structured models are restricted by oftentimes very local neighborhood structure, which cannot be increased for computational complexity reasons, and by the fact that the output configuration, or a representation thereof, cannot be transformed further. Very recent approaches which address those issues include graphical model inference inside deep nets so as to permit subsequent non-linear output space transformations. However, optimization of those formulations is challenging and not well understood. Here, we develop a novel model which generalizes existing approaches, such as structured prediction energy networks, and discuss a formulation which maintains applicability of existing inference techniques.


Structured Prediction Energy Networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We introduce structured prediction energy networks (SPENs), a flexible framework for structured prediction. A deep architecture is used to define an energy function of candidate labels, and then predictions are produced by using back-propagation to iteratively optimize the energy with respect to the labels. This deep architecture captures dependencies between labels that would lead to intractable graphical models, and performs structure learning by automatically learning discriminative features of the structured output. One natural application of our technique is multi-label classification, which traditionally has required strict prior assumptions about the interactions between labels to ensure tractable learning and prediction. We are able to apply SPENs to multi-label problems with substantially larger label sets than previous applications of structured prediction, while modeling high-order interactions using minimal structural assumptions. Overall, deep learning provides remarkable tools for learning features of the inputs to a prediction problem, and this work extends these techniques to learning features of structured outputs. Our experiments provide impressive performance on a variety of benchmark multi-label classification tasks, demonstrate that our technique can be used to provide interpretable structure learning, and illuminate fundamental trade-offs between feed-forward and iterative structured prediction.


A Primal-Dual Message-Passing Algorithm for Approximated Large Scale Structured Prediction

Neural Information Processing Systems

In this paper we propose an approximated learning framework for large scale graphical models and derive message passing algorithms for learning their parameters efficiently. We first relate CRFs and structured SVMs and show that in the CRF's primal a variant of the log-partition function, known as soft-max, smoothly approximates the hinge loss function of structured SVMs. We then propose an intuitive approximation for structured prediction problems using Fenchel duality based on a local entropy approximation that computes the exact gradients of the approximated problem and is guaranteed to converge. Unlike existing approaches, this allow us to learn graphical models with cycles and very large number of parameters efficiently. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in an image denoising task. This task was previously solved by sharing parameters across cliques. In contrast, our algorithm is able to efficiently learn large number of parameters resulting in orders of magnitude better prediction.