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A Survey on Data Collection for Machine Learning: a Big Data - AI Integration Perspective

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Data collection is a major bottleneck in machine learning and an active research topic in multiple communities. There are largely two reasons data collection has recently become a critical issue. First, as machine learning is becoming more widely-used, we are seeing new applications that do not necessarily have enough labeled data. Second, unlike traditional machine learning where feature engineering is the bottleneck, deep learning techniques automatically generate features, but instead require large amounts of labeled data. Interestingly, recent research in data collection comes not only from the machine learning, natural language, and computer vision communities, but also from the data management community due to the importance of handling large amounts of data. In this survey, we perform a comprehensive study of data collection from a data management point of view. Data collection largely consists of data acquisition, data labeling, and improvement of existing data or models. We provide a research landscape of these operations, provide guidelines on which technique to use when, and identify interesting research challenges. The integration of machine learning and data management for data collection is part of a larger trend of Big data and Artificial Intelligence (AI) integration and opens many opportunities for new research.


A Survey of Deep Learning for Scientific Discovery

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Over the past few years, we have seen fundamental breakthroughs in core problems in machine learning, largely driven by advances in deep neural networks. At the same time, the amount of data collected in a wide array of scientific domains is dramatically increasing in both size and complexity. Taken together, this suggests many exciting opportunities for deep learning applications in scientific settings. But a significant challenge to this is simply knowing where to start. The sheer breadth and diversity of different deep learning techniques makes it difficult to determine what scientific problems might be most amenable to these methods, or which specific combination of methods might offer the most promising first approach. In this survey, we focus on addressing this central issue, providing an overview of many widely used deep learning models, spanning visual, sequential and graph structured data, associated tasks and different training methods, along with techniques to use deep learning with less data and better interpret these complex models --- two central considerations for many scientific use cases. We also include overviews of the full design process, implementation tips, and links to a plethora of tutorials, research summaries and open-sourced deep learning pipelines and pretrained models, developed by the community. We hope that this survey will help accelerate the use of deep learning across different scientific domains.


Secure and Robust Machine Learning for Healthcare: A Survey

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recent years have witnessed widespread adoption of machine learning (ML)/deep learning (DL) techniques due to their superior performance for a variety of healthcare applications ranging from the prediction of cardiac arrest from one-dimensional heart signals to computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) using multi-dimensional medical images. Notwithstanding the impressive performance of ML/DL, there are still lingering doubts regarding the robustness of ML/DL in healthcare settings (which is traditionally considered quite challenging due to the myriad security and privacy issues involved), especially in light of recent results that have shown that ML/DL are vulnerable to adversarial attacks. In this paper, we present an overview of various application areas in healthcare that leverage such techniques from security and privacy point of view and present associated challenges. In addition, we present potential methods to ensure secure and privacy-preserving ML for healthcare applications. Finally, we provide insight into the current research challenges and promising directions for future research.


Machine Learning in Python: Main developments and technology trends in data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Smarter applications are making better use of the insights gleaned from data, having an impact on every industry and research discipline. At the core of this revolution lies the tools and the methods that are driving it, from processing the massive piles of data generated each day to learning from and taking useful action. Deep neural networks, along with advancements in classical ML and scalable general-purpose GPU computing, have become critical components of artificial intelligence, enabling many of these astounding breakthroughs and lowering the barrier to adoption. Python continues to be the most preferred language for scientific computing, data science, and machine learning, boosting both performance and productivity by enabling the use of low-level libraries and clean high-level APIs. This survey offers insight into the field of machine learning with Python, taking a tour through important topics to identify some of the core hardware and software paradigms that have enabled it. We cover widely-used libraries and concepts, collected together for holistic comparison, with the goal of educating the reader and driving the field of Python machine learning forward.


Realistic Evaluation of Deep Semi-Supervised Learning Algorithms

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Semi-supervised learning (SSL) provides a powerful framework for leveraging unlabeled data when labels are limited or expensive to obtain. SSL algorithms based on deep neural networks have recently proven successful on standard benchmark tasks. However, we argue that these benchmarks fail to address many issues that these algorithms would face in real-world applications. After creating a unified reimplementation of various widely-used SSL techniques, we test them in a suite of experiments designed to address these issues. We find that the performance of simple baselines which do not use unlabeled data is often underreported, that SSL methods differ in sensitivity to the amount of labeled and unlabeled data, and that performance can degrade substantially when the unlabeled dataset contains out-of-class examples. To help guide SSL research towards real-world applicability, we make our unified reimplemention and evaluation platform publicly available.