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Ridge Regression: Structure, Cross-Validation, and Sketching

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We study the following three fundamental problems about ridge regression: (1) what is the structure of the estimator? (2) how to correctly use cross-validation to choose the regularization parameter? and (3) how to accelerate computation without losing too much accuracy? We consider the three problems in a unified large-data linear model. We give a precise representation of ridge regression as a covariance matrix-dependent linear combination of the true parameter and the noise. We study the bias of $K$-fold cross-validation for choosing the regularization parameter, and propose a simple bias-correction. We analyze the accuracy of primal and dual sketching for ridge regression, showing they are surprisingly accurate. Our results are illustrated by simulations and by analyzing empirical data.


Statistical and Algorithmic Perspectives on Randomized Sketching for Ordinary Least-Squares -- ICML

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We consider statistical and algorithmic aspects of solving large-scale least-squares (LS) problems using randomized sketching algorithms. Prior results show that, from an \emph{algorithmic perspective}, when using sketching matrices constructed from random projections and leverage-score sampling, if the number of samples $r$ much smaller than the original sample size $n$, then the worst-case (WC) error is the same as solving the original problem, up to a very small relative error. From a \emph{statistical perspective}, one typically considers the mean-squared error performance of randomized sketching algorithms, when data are generated according to a statistical linear model. In this paper, we provide a rigorous comparison of both perspectives leading to insights on how they differ. To do this, we first develop a framework for assessing, in a unified manner, algorithmic and statistical aspects of randomized sketching methods. We then consider the statistical prediction efficiency (PE) and the statistical residual efficiency (RE) of the sketched LS estimator; and we use our framework to provide upper bounds for several types of random projection and random sampling algorithms. Among other results, we show that the RE can be upper bounded when $r$ is much smaller than $n$, while the PE typically requires the number of samples $r$ to be substantially larger. Lower bounds developed in subsequent work show that our upper bounds on PE can not be improved.


Improved Subsampled Randomized Hadamard Transform for Linear SVM

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Subsampled Randomized Hadamard Transform (SRHT), a popular random projection method that can efficiently project a $d$-dimensional data into $r$-dimensional space ($r \ll d$) in $O(dlog(d))$ time, has been widely used to address the challenge of high-dimensionality in machine learning. SRHT works by rotating the input data matrix $\mathbf{X} \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times d}$ by Randomized Walsh-Hadamard Transform followed with a subsequent uniform column sampling on the rotated matrix. Despite the advantages of SRHT, one limitation of SRHT is that it generates the new low-dimensional embedding without considering any specific properties of a given dataset. Therefore, this data-independent random projection method may result in inferior and unstable performance when used for a particular machine learning task, e.g., classification. To overcome this limitation, we analyze the effect of using SRHT for random projection in the context of linear SVM classification. Based on our analysis, we propose importance sampling and deterministic top-$r$ sampling to produce effective low-dimensional embedding instead of uniform sampling SRHT. In addition, we also proposed a new supervised non-uniform sampling method. Our experimental results have demonstrated that our proposed methods can achieve higher classification accuracies than SRHT and other random projection methods on six real-life datasets.


Fast and Robust Least Squares Estimation in Corrupted Linear Models

Neural Information Processing Systems

Subsampling methods have been recently proposed to speed up least squares estimation in large scale settings. However, these algorithms are typically not robust to outliers or corruptions in the observed covariates. The concept of influence that was developed for regression diagnostics can be used to detect such corrupted observations as shown in this paper. This property of influence -- for which we also develop a randomized approximation -- motivates our proposed subsampling algorithm for large scale corrupted linear regression which limits the influence of data points since highly influential points contribute most to the residual error. Under a general model of corrupted observations, we show theoretically and empirically on a variety of simulated and real datasets that our algorithm improves over the current state-of-the-art approximation schemes for ordinary least squares.


A Statistical Perspective on Randomized Sketching for Ordinary Least-Squares

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We consider statistical as well as algorithmic aspects of solving large-scale least-squares (LS) problems using randomized sketching algorithms. For a LS problem with input data $(X, Y) \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times p} \times \mathbb{R}^n$, sketching algorithms use a sketching matrix, $S\in\mathbb{R}^{r \times n}$ with $r \ll n$. Then, rather than solving the LS problem using the full data $(X,Y)$, sketching algorithms solve the LS problem using only the sketched data $(SX, SY)$. Prior work has typically adopted an algorithmic perspective, in that it has made no statistical assumptions on the input $X$ and $Y$, and instead it has been assumed that the data $(X,Y)$ are fixed and worst-case (WC). Prior results show that, when using sketching matrices such as random projections and leverage-score sampling algorithms, with $p < r \ll n$, the WC error is the same as solving the original problem, up to a small constant. From a statistical perspective, we typically consider the mean-squared error performance of randomized sketching algorithms, when data $(X, Y)$ are generated according to a statistical model $Y = X \beta + \epsilon$, where $\epsilon$ is a noise process. We provide a rigorous comparison of both perspectives leading to insights on how they differ. To do this, we first develop a framework for assessing algorithmic and statistical aspects of randomized sketching methods. We then consider the statistical prediction efficiency (PE) and the statistical residual efficiency (RE) of the sketched LS estimator; and we use our framework to provide upper bounds for several types of random projection and random sampling sketching algorithms. Among other results, we show that the RE can be upper bounded when $p < r \ll n$ while the PE typically requires the sample size $r$ to be substantially larger. Lower bounds developed in subsequent results show that our upper bounds on PE can not be improved.