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A.I. rivals expert eyes at reading breast tissue biopsies - Futurity

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You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. A new artificial intelligence system could help pathologists read biopsies more accurately, and lead to better detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, researchers say. Doctors examine images of breast tissue biopsies to diagnose breast cancer. But the differences between cancerous and benign images can be difficult for the human eye to classify. The new algorithm helps interpret them, and does so nearly as accurately or better than an experienced pathologist, depending on the task.


Artificial intelligence could yield more accurate breast cancer diagnoses 7wData

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Researchers at University of Washington and University of California, Los Angeles, have developed an artificial intelligence system that could help pathologists read biopsies more accurately, and lead to better detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Doctors examine images of breast tissue biopsies to diagnose breast cancer. But the differences between cancerous and benign images can be difficult for the human eye to classify. This new algorithm helps interpret them -- and it does so nearly as accurately or better than an experienced pathologist, depending on the task. The research team published its results Aug. 9 in the journal JAMA Network Open.


UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center : Latest News

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UCLA researchers have developed an artificial intelligence system that could help pathologists read biopsies more accurately and to better detect and diagnose breast cancer. The new system, described in a study published today in JAMA Network Open, helps interpret medical images used to diagnose breast cancer that can be difficult for the human eye to classify, and it does so nearly as accurately or better as experienced pathologists. "It is critical to get a correct diagnosis from the beginning so that we can guide patients to the most effective treatments," said Dr. Joann Elmore, the study's senior author and a professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. A 2015 study led by Elmore found that pathologists often disagree on the interpretation of breast biopsies, which are performed on millions of women each year. That earlier research revealed that diagnostic errors occurred in about one out of every six women who had ductal carcinoma in situ (a noninvasive type of breast cancer), and that incorrect diagnoses were given in about half of the biopsy cases of breast atypia (abnormal cells that are associated with a higher risk for breast cancer).


Artificial intelligence could yield more accurate breast cancer diagnoses: System can interpret images that are challenging for doctors to classify

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The new system, described in a study published in JAMA Network Open, helps interpret medical images used to diagnose breast cancer that can be difficult for the human eye to classify, and it does so nearly as accurately or better as experienced pathologists. "It is critical to get a correct diagnosis from the beginning so that we can guide patients to the most effective treatments," said Dr. Joann Elmore, the study's senior author and a professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. A 2015 study led by Elmore found that pathologists often disagree on the interpretation of breast biopsies, which are performed on millions of women each year. That earlier research revealed that diagnostic errors occurred in about one out of every six women who had ductal carcinoma in situ (a noninvasive type of breast cancer), and that incorrect diagnoses were given in about half of the biopsy cases of breast atypia (abnormal cells that are associated with a higher risk for breast cancer). "Medical images of breast biopsies contain a great deal of complex data and interpreting them can be very subjective," said Elmore, who is also a researcher at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.


A Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Breast Pathology: A Deep Learning Approach with Model Interpretability from Pathological Perspective

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Objective: We develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system using deep learning approaches for lesion detection and classification on whole-slide images (WSIs) with breast cancer. The deep features being distinguishing in classification from the convolutional neural networks (CNN) are demonstrated in this study to provide comprehensive interpretability for the proposed CAD system using pathological knowledge. Methods: In the experiment, a total of 186 slides of WSIs were collected and classified into three categories: Non-Carcinoma, Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), and Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC). Instead of conducting pixel-wise classification into three classes directly, we designed a hierarchical framework with the multi-view scheme that performs lesion detection for region proposal at higher magnification first and then conducts lesion classification at lower magnification for each detected lesion. Results: The slide-level accuracy rate for three-category classification reaches 90.8% (99/109) through 5-fold cross-validation and achieves 94.8% (73/77) on the testing set. The experimental results show that the morphological characteristics and co-occurrence properties learned by the deep learning models for lesion classification are accordant with the clinical rules in diagnosis. Conclusion: The pathological interpretability of the deep features not only enhances the reliability of the proposed CAD system to gain acceptance from medical specialists, but also facilitates the development of deep learning frameworks for various tasks in pathology. Significance: This paper presents a CAD system for pathological image analysis, which fills the clinical requirements and can be accepted by medical specialists with providing its interpretability from the pathological perspective.