Natural Language Processing: the age of Transformers

#artificialintelligence

This article is the first installment of a two-post series on Building a machine reading comprehension system using the latest advances in deep learning for NLP. Stay tuned for the second part, where we'll introduce a pre-trained model called BERT that will take your NLP projects to the next level! In the recent past, if you specialized in natural language processing (NLP), there may have been times when you felt a little jealous of your colleagues working in computer vision. It seemed as if they had all the fun: the annual ImageNet classification challenge, Neural Style Transfer, Generative Adversarial Networks, to name a few. At last, the dry spell is over, and the NLP revolution is well underway!


The Illustrated GPT-2 (Visualizing Transformer Language Models)

#artificialintelligence

This year, we saw a dazzling application of machine learning. The OpenAI GPT-2 exhibited impressive ability of writing coherent and passionate essays that exceed what we anticipated current language models are able to produce. The GPT-2 wasn't a particularly novel architecture – it's architecture is very similar to the decoder-only transformer. The GPT2 was, however, a very large, transformer-based language model trained on a massive dataset. In this post, we'll look at the architecture that enabled the model to produce its results. We will go into the depths of its self-attention layer. My goal here is to also supplement my earlier post, The Illustrated Transformer, with more visuals explaining the inner-workings of transformers, and how they've evolved since the original paper. My hope is that this visual language will hopefully make it easier to explain later Transformer-based models as their inner-workings continue to evolve.


Copy this Sentence

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Attention is an operation that selects some largest element from some set, where the notion of largest is defined elsewhere. Applying this operation to sequence to sequence mapping results in significant improvements to the task at hand. In this paper we provide the mathematical definition of attention and examine its application to sequence to sequence models. We highlight the exact correspondences between machine learning implementations of attention and our mathematical definition. We provide clear evidence of effectiveness of attention mechanisms evaluating models with varying degrees of attention on a very simple task: copying a sentence. We find that models that make greater use of attention perform much better on sequence to sequence mapping tasks, converge faster and are more stable.


Sequence Generation: From Both Sides to the Middle

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The encoder-decoder framework has achieved promising process for many sequence generation tasks, such as neural machine translation and text summarization. Such a framework usually generates a sequence token by token from left to right, hence (1) this autoregressive decoding procedure is time-consuming when the output sentence becomes longer, and (2) it lacks the guidance of future context which is crucial to avoid under translation. To alleviate these issues, we propose a synchronous bidirectional sequence generation (SBSG) model which predicts its outputs from both sides to the middle simultaneously. In the SBSG model, we enable the left-to-right (L2R) and right-to-left (R2L) generation to help and interact with each other by leveraging interactive bidirectional attention network. Experiments on neural machine translation (En-De, Ch-En, and En-Ro) and text summarization tasks show that the proposed model significantly speeds up decoding while improving the generation quality compared to the autoregressive Transformer.


The Best of Both Worlds: Combining Recent Advances in Neural Machine Translation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The past year has witnessed rapid advances in sequence-to-sequence (seq2seq) modeling for Machine Translation (MT). The classic RNN-based approaches to MT were first out-performed by the convolutional seq2seq model, which was then out-performed by the more recent Transformer model. Each of these new approaches consists of a fundamental architecture accompanied by a set of modeling and training techniques that are in principle applicable to other seq2seq architectures. In this paper, we tease apart the new architectures and their accompanying techniques in two ways. First, we identify several key modeling and training techniques, and apply them to the RNN architecture, yielding a new RNMT+ model that outperforms all of the three fundamental architectures on the benchmark WMT'14 English to French and English to German tasks. Second, we analyze the properties of each fundamental seq2seq architecture and devise new hybrid architectures intended to combine their strengths. Our hybrid models obtain further improvements, outperforming the RNMT+ model on both benchmark datasets.