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Insertion-Deletion Transformer

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We propose the Insertion-Deletion Transformer, a novel transformer-based neural architecture and training method for sequence generation. The model consists of two phases that are executed iteratively, 1) an insertion phase and 2) a deletion phase. The insertion phase parameterizes a distribution of insertions on the current output hypothesis, while the deletion phase parameterizes a distribution of deletions over the current output hypothesis. The training method is a principled and simple algorithm, where the deletion model obtains its signal directly on-policy from the insertion model output. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our Insertion-Deletion Transformer on synthetic translation tasks, obtaining significant BLEU score improvement over an insertion-only model.


Natural Language Processing: the age of Transformers

#artificialintelligence

This article is the first installment of a two-post series on Building a machine reading comprehension system using the latest advances in deep learning for NLP. Stay tuned for the second part, where we'll introduce a pre-trained model called BERT that will take your NLP projects to the next level! In the recent past, if you specialized in natural language processing (NLP), there may have been times when you felt a little jealous of your colleagues working in computer vision. It seemed as if they had all the fun: the annual ImageNet classification challenge, Neural Style Transfer, Generative Adversarial Networks, to name a few. At last, the dry spell is over, and the NLP revolution is well underway!


Dynamic Evaluation of Transformer Language Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This research note combines two methods that have recently improved the state of the art in language modeling: Transformers and dynamic evaluation. Transformers use stacked layers of self-attention that allow them to capture long range dependencies in sequential data. Dynamic evaluation fits models to the recent sequence history, allowing them to assign higher probabilities to reoccurring sequential patterns. By applying dynamic evaluation to Transformer-XL models, we improve the state of the art on enwik8 from 0.99 to 0.94 bits/char, text8 from 1.08 to 1.04 bits/char, and WikiText-103 from 18.3 to 16.4 perplexity points. Language modeling is a commonly used machine learning benchmark with applications to speech recognition, machine translation, text generation, and unsupervised learning in natural language processing tasks.


Sequence Generation: From Both Sides to the Middle

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The encoder-decoder framework has achieved promising process for many sequence generation tasks, such as neural machine translation and text summarization. Such a framework usually generates a sequence token by token from left to right, hence (1) this autoregressive decoding procedure is time-consuming when the output sentence becomes longer, and (2) it lacks the guidance of future context which is crucial to avoid under translation. To alleviate these issues, we propose a synchronous bidirectional sequence generation (SBSG) model which predicts its outputs from both sides to the middle simultaneously. In the SBSG model, we enable the left-to-right (L2R) and right-to-left (R2L) generation to help and interact with each other by leveraging interactive bidirectional attention network. Experiments on neural machine translation (En-De, Ch-En, and En-Ro) and text summarization tasks show that the proposed model significantly speeds up decoding while improving the generation quality compared to the autoregressive Transformer.


The Illustrated GPT-2 (Visualizing Transformer Language Models)

#artificialintelligence

This year, we saw a dazzling application of machine learning. The OpenAI GPT-2 exhibited impressive ability of writing coherent and passionate essays that exceed what we anticipated current language models are able to produce. The GPT-2 wasn't a particularly novel architecture – it's architecture is very similar to the decoder-only transformer. The GPT2 was, however, a very large, transformer-based language model trained on a massive dataset. In this post, we'll look at the architecture that enabled the model to produce its results. We will go into the depths of its self-attention layer. My goal here is to also supplement my earlier post, The Illustrated Transformer, with more visuals explaining the inner-workings of transformers, and how they've evolved since the original paper. My hope is that this visual language will hopefully make it easier to explain later Transformer-based models as their inner-workings continue to evolve.