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PAC-Bayesian Theorems for Domain Adaptation with Specialization to Linear Classifiers

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In this paper, we provide two main contributions in PAC-Bayesian theory for domain adaptation where the objective is to learn, from a source distribution, a well-performing majority vote on a different target distribution. On the one hand, we propose an improvement of the previous approach proposed by Germain et al. (2013), that relies on a novel distribution pseudodistance based on a disagreement averaging, allowing us to derive a new tighter PAC-Bayesian domain adaptation bound for the stochastic Gibbs classifier. We specialize it to linear classifiers, and design a learning algorithm which shows interesting results on a synthetic problem and on a popular sentiment annotation task. On the other hand, we generalize these results to multisource domain adaptation allowing us to take into account different source domains. This study opens the door to tackle domain adaptation tasks by making use of all the PAC-Bayesian tools.


A review of single-source unsupervised domain adaptation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Domain adaptation has become a prominent problem setting in machine learning and related fields. This review asks the questions: when and how a classifier can learn from a source domain and generalize to a target domain. As for when, we review conditions that allow for cross-domain generalization error bounds. As for how, we present a categorization of approaches, divided into, what we refer to as, sample-based, feature-based and inference-based methods. Sample-based methods focus on weighting individual observations during training based on their importance to the target domain. Feature-based methods focus on mapping, projecting and representing features such that a source classifier performs well on the target domain and inference-based methods focus on alternative estimators, such as robust, minimax or Bayesian. Our categorization highlights recurring ideas and raises a number of questions important to further research.


Multi-source Distilling Domain Adaptation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Deep neural networks suffer from performance decay when there is domain shift between the labeled source domain and unlabeled target domain, which motivates the research on domain adaptation (DA). Conventional DA methods usually assume that the labeled data is sampled from a single source distribution. However, in practice, labeled data may be collected from multiple sources, while naive application of the single-source DA algorithms may lead to suboptimal solutions. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-source distilling domain adaptation (MDDA) network, which not only considers the different distances among multiple sources and the target, but also investigates the different similarities of the source samples to the target ones. Specifically, the proposed MDDA includes four stages: (1) pre-train the source classifiers separately using the training data from each source; (2) adversarially map the target into the feature space of each source respectively by minimizing the empirical Wasserstein distance between source and target; (3) select the source training samples that are closer to the target to fine-tune the source classifiers; and (4) classify each encoded target feature by corresponding source classifier, and aggregate different predictions using respective domain weight, which corresponds to the discrepancy between each source and target. Extensive experiments are conducted on public DA benchmarks, and the results demonstrate that the proposed MDDA significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art approaches. Our source code is released at: https://github.com/daoyuan98/MDDA.


A New PAC-Bayesian Perspective on Domain Adaptation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We study the issue of PAC-Bayesian domain adaptation: We want to learn, from a source domain, a majority vote model dedicated to a target one. Our theoretical contribution brings a new perspective by deriving an upper-bound on the target risk where the distributions' divergence---expressed as a ratio---controls the trade-off between a source error measure and the target voters' disagreement. Our bound suggests that one has to focus on regions where the source data is informative.From this result, we derive a PAC-Bayesian generalization bound, and specialize it to linear classifiers. Then, we infer a learning algorithmand perform experiments on real data.


An Improvement to the Domain Adaptation Bound in a PAC-Bayesian context

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This paper provides a theoretical analysis of domain adaptation based on the PAC-Bayesian theory. We propose an improvement of the previous domain adaptation bound obtained by Germain et al. in two ways. We first give another generalization bound tighter and easier to interpret. Moreover, we provide a new analysis of the constant term appearing in the bound that can be of high interest for developing new algorithmic solutions.