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A Comprehensive Survey of Data Mining-based Fraud Detection Research

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This survey paper categorises, compares, and summarises from almost all published technical and review articles in automated fraud detection within the last 10 years. It defines the professional fraudster, formalises the main types and subtypes of known fraud, and presents the nature of data evidence collected within affected industries. Within the business context of mining the data to achieve higher cost savings, this research presents methods and techniques together with their problems. Compared to all related reviews on fraud detection, this survey covers much more technical articles and is the only one, to the best of our knowledge, which proposes alternative data and solutions from related domains.


Online Machine Learning in Big Data Streams

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The area of online machine learning in big data streams covers algorithms that are (1) distributed and (2) work from data streams with only a limited possibility to store past data. The first requirement mostly concerns software architectures and efficient algorithms. The second one also imposes nontrivial theoretical restrictions on the modeling methods: In the data stream model, older data is no longer available to revise earlier suboptimal modeling decisions as the fresh data arrives. In this article, we provide an overview of distributed software architectures and libraries as well as machine learning models for online learning. We highlight the most important ideas for classification, regression, recommendation, and unsupervised modeling from streaming data, and we show how they are implemented in various distributed data stream processing systems. This article is a reference material and not a survey. We do not attempt to be comprehensive in describing all existing methods and solutions; rather, we give pointers to the most important resources in the field. All related sub-fields, online algorithms, online learning, and distributed data processing are hugely dominant in current research and development with conceptually new research results and software components emerging at the time of writing. In this article, we refer to several survey results, both for distributed data processing and for online machine learning. Compared to past surveys, our article is different because we discuss recommender systems in extended detail.


Probabilistic Modeling for Novelty Detection with Applications to Fraud Identification

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Novelty detection is the unsupervised problem of identifying anomalies in test data which significantly differ from the training set. Novelty detection is one of the classic challenges in Machine Learning and a core component of several research areas such as fraud detection, intrusion detection, medical diagnosis, data cleaning, and fault prevention. While numerous algorithms were designed to address this problem, most methods are only suitable to model continuous numerical data. Tackling datasets composed of mixed-type features, such as numerical and categorical data, or temporal datasets describing discrete event sequences is a challenging task. In addition to the supported data types, the key criteria for efficient novelty detection methods are the ability to accurately dissociate novelties from nominal samples, the interpretability, the scalability and the robustness to anomalies located in the training data. In this thesis, we investigate novel ways to tackle these issues. In particular, we propose (i) an experimental comparison of novelty detection methods for mixed-type data (ii) an experimental comparison of novelty detection methods for sequence data, (iii) a probabilistic nonparametric novelty detection method for mixed-type data based on Dirichlet process mixtures and exponential-family distributions and (iv) an autoencoder-based novelty detection model with encoder/decoder modelled as deep Gaussian processes.


One-Class Classification: Taxonomy of Study and Review of Techniques

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

One-class classification (OCC) algorithms aim to build classification models when the negative class is either absent, poorly sampled or not well defined. This unique situation constrains the learning of efficient classifiers by defining class boundary just with the knowledge of positive class. The OCC problem has been considered and applied under many research themes, such as outlier/novelty detection and concept learning. In this paper we present a unified view of the general problem of OCC by presenting a taxonomy of study for OCC problems, which is based on the availability of training data, algorithms used and the application domains applied. We further delve into each of the categories of the proposed taxonomy and present a comprehensive literature review of the OCC algorithms, techniques and methodologies with a focus on their significance, limitations and applications. We conclude our paper by discussing some open research problems in the field of OCC and present our vision for future research.


Ensuring the Robustness and Reliability of Data-Driven Knowledge Discovery Models in Production and Manufacturing

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The implementation of robust, stable, and user-centered data analytics and machine learning models is confronted by numerous challenges in production and manufacturing. Therefore, a systematic approach is required to develop, evaluate, and deploy such models. The data-driven knowledge discovery framework provides an orderly partition of the data-mining processes to ensure the practical implementation of data analytics and machine learning models. However, the practical application of robust industry-specific data-driven knowledge discovery models faces multiple data-- and model-development--related issues. These issues should be carefully addressed by allowing a flexible, customized, and industry-specific knowledge discovery framework; in our case, this takes the form of the cross-industry standard process for data mining (CRISP-DM). This framework is designed to ensure active cooperation between different phases to adequately address data- and model-related issues. In this paper, we review several extensions of CRISP-DM models and various data-robustness-- and model-robustness--related problems in machine learning, which currently lacks proper cooperation between data experts and business experts because of the limitations of data-driven knowledge discovery models.