Multi-Target Prediction: A Unifying View on Problems and Methods

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Multi-target prediction (MTP) is concerned with the simultaneous prediction of multiple target variables of diverse type. Due to its enormous application potential, it has developed into an active and rapidly expanding research field that combines several subfields of machine learning, including multivariate regression, multi-label classification, multi-task learning, dyadic prediction, zero-shot learning, network inference, and matrix completion. In this paper, we present a unifying view on MTP problems and methods. First, we formally discuss commonalities and differences between existing MTP problems. To this end, we introduce a general framework that covers the above subfields as special cases. As a second contribution, we provide a structured overview of MTP methods. This is accomplished by identifying a number of key properties, which distinguish such methods and determine their suitability for different types of problems. Finally, we also discuss a few challenges for future research.


Online Multi-Target Tracking Using Recurrent Neural Networks

AAAI Conferences

We present a novel approach to online multi-target tracking based on recurrent neural networks (RNNs). Tracking multiple objects in real-world scenes involves many challenges, including a) an a-priori unknown and time-varying number of targets, b) a continuous state estimation of all present targets, and c) a discrete combinatorial problem of data association. Most previous methods involve complex models that require tedious tuning of parameters. Here, we propose for the first time, an end-to-end learning approach for online multi-target tracking. Existing deep learning methods are not designed for the above challenges and cannot be trivially applied to the task. Our solution addresses all of the above points in a principled way. Experiments on both synthetic and real data show promising results obtained at ~300 Hz on a standard CPU, and pave the way towards future research in this direction.


Towards meta-learning for multi-target regression problems

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Several multi-target regression methods were devel-oped in the last years aiming at improving predictive performanceby exploring inter-target correlation within the problem. However, none of these methods outperforms the others for all problems. This motivates the development of automatic approachesto recommend the most suitable multi-target regression method. In this paper, we propose a meta-learning system to recommend the best predictive method for a given multi-target regression problem. We performed experiments with a meta-dataset generated by a total of 648 synthetic datasets. These datasets were created to explore distinct inter-targets characteristics toward recommending the most promising method. In experiments, we evaluated four different algorithms with different biases as meta-learners. Our meta-dataset is composed of 58 meta-features, based on: statistical information, correlation characteristics, linear landmarking, from the distribution and smoothness of the data, and has four different meta-labels. Results showed that induced meta-models were able to recommend the best methodfor different base level datasets with a balanced accuracy superior to 70% using a Random Forest meta-model, which statistically outperformed the meta-learning baselines.


Perceive Your Users in Depth: Learning Universal User Representations from Multiple E-commerce Tasks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Tasks such as search and recommendation have become increas- ingly important for E-commerce to deal with the information over- load problem. To meet the diverse needs of di erent users, person- alization plays an important role. In many large portals such as Taobao and Amazon, there are a bunch of di erent types of search and recommendation tasks operating simultaneously for person- alization. However, most of current techniques address each task separately. This is suboptimal as no information about users shared across di erent tasks. In this work, we propose to learn universal user representations across multiple tasks for more e ective personalization. In partic- ular, user behavior sequences (e.g., click, bookmark or purchase of products) are modeled by LSTM and attention mechanism by integrating all the corresponding content, behavior and temporal information. User representations are shared and learned in an end-to-end setting across multiple tasks. Bene ting from better information utilization of multiple tasks, the user representations are more e ective to re ect their interests and are more general to be transferred to new tasks. We refer this work as Deep User Perception Network (DUPN) and conduct an extensive set of o ine and online experiments. Across all tested ve di erent tasks, our DUPN consistently achieves better results by giving more e ective user representations. Moreover, we deploy DUPN in large scale operational tasks in Taobao. Detailed implementations, e.g., incre- mental model updating, are also provided to address the practical issues for the real world applications.


ALOHA: Auxiliary Loss Optimization for Hypothesis Augmentation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Malware detection is a popular application of Machine Learning for Information Security (ML-Sec), in which an ML classifier is trained to predict whether a given file is malware or benignware. Parameters of this classifier are typically optimized such that outputs from the model over a set of input samples most closely match the samples' true malicious/benign (1/0) target labels. However, there are often a number of other sources of contextual metadata for each malware sample, beyond an aggregate malicious/benign label, including multiple labeling sources and malware type information (e.g., ransomware, trojan, etc.), which we can feed to the classifier as auxiliary prediction targets. In this work, we fit deep neural networks to multiple additional targets derived from metadata in a threat intelligence feed for Portable Executable (PE) malware and benignware, including a multi-source malicious/benign loss, a count loss on multi-source detections, and a semantic malware attribute tag loss. We find that incorporating multiple auxiliary loss terms yields a marked improvement in performance on the main detection task. We also demonstrate that these gains likely stem from a more informed neural network representation and are not due to a regularization artifact of multi-target learning. Our auxiliary loss architecture yields a significant reduction in detection error rate (false negatives) of 42.6% at a false positive rate (FPR) of $10^{-3}$ when compared to a similar model with only one target, and a decrease of 53.8% at $10^{-5}$ FPR.