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Trace Lasso: a trace norm regularization for correlated designs

Neural Information Processing Systems

Using the $\ell_1$-norm to regularize the estimation of the parameter vector of a linear model leads to an unstable estimator when covariates are highly correlated. In this paper, we introduce a new penalty function which takes into account the correlation of the design matrix to stabilize the estimation. This norm, called the trace Lasso, uses the trace norm of the selected covariates, which is a convex surrogate of their rank, as the criterion of model complexity. We analyze the properties of our norm, describe an optimization algorithm based on reweighted least-squares, and illustrate the behavior of this norm on synthetic data, showing that it is more adapted to strong correlations than competing methods such as the elastic net.


Regularization in Machine Learning

@machinelearnbot

One of the major aspects of training your machine learning model is avoiding overfitting. The model will have a low accuracy if it is overfitting. This happens because your model is trying too hard to capture the noise in your training dataset. By noise we mean the data points that don't really represent the true properties of your data, but random chance. Learning such data points, makes your model more flexible, at the risk of overfitting.


Analytic solution and stationary phase approximation for the Bayesian lasso and elastic net

Neural Information Processing Systems

The lasso and elastic net linear regression models impose a double-exponential prior distribution on the model parameters to achieve regression shrinkage and variable selection, allowing the inference of robust models from large data sets. However, there has been limited success in deriving estimates for the full posterior distribution of regression coefficients in these models, due to a need to evaluate analytically intractable partition function integrals. Here, the Fourier transform is used to express these integrals as complex-valued oscillatory integrals over "regression frequencies". This results in an analytic expansion and stationary phase approximation for the partition functions of the Bayesian lasso and elastic net, where the non-differentiability of the double-exponential prior has so far eluded such an approach. Use of this approximation leads to highly accurate numerical estimates for the expectation values and marginal posterior distributions of the regression coefficients, and allows for Bayesian inference of much higher dimensional models than previously possible.


Analytic solution and stationary phase approximation for the Bayesian lasso and elastic net

Neural Information Processing Systems

The lasso and elastic net linear regression models impose a double-exponential prior distribution on the model parameters to achieve regression shrinkage and variable selection, allowing the inference of robust models from large data sets. However, there has been limited success in deriving estimates for the full posterior distribution of regression coefficients in these models, due to a need to evaluate analytically intractable partition function integrals. Here, the Fourier transform is used to express these integrals as complex-valued oscillatory integrals over "regression frequencies". This results in an analytic expansion and stationary phase approximation for the partition functions of the Bayesian lasso and elastic net, where the non-differentiability of the double-exponential prior has so far eluded such an approach. Use of this approximation leads to highly accurate numerical estimates for the expectation values and marginal posterior distributions of the regression coefficients, and allows for Bayesian inference of much higher dimensional models than previously possible.


A Brief Introduction to the Temporal Group LASSO and its Potential Applications in Healthcare

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The Temporal Group LASSO is an example of a multi-task, regularized regression approach for the prediction of response variables that vary over time. The aim of this work is to introduce the reader to the concepts behind the Temporal Group LASSO and its related methods, as well as to the type of potential applications in a healthcare setting that the method has. We argue that the method is attractive because of its ability to reduce overfitting, select predictors, learn smooth effect patterns over time, and finally, its simplicity