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Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Specs Rated A For Display Quality

International Business Times

The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 has the best display on the market, according to gadget lab DisplayMate. The smartphone, which was unveiled last Wednesday has received an A rating for its screen quality, a first in DisplayMate history. The Galaxy Note 8 display beats out DisplayMate's former top screen, on the Galaxy S8, which has a 5.8-inch QuadHD display with a 570 ppi pixel density and brightness capacity of over 1,000 nits. The Galaxy Note 8 display is also Samsung's largest on a premium device, beating out only the Galaxy S8, which features a 6.2-inch display. The device features Samsung's infinity display design, which includes an 18:9:5 aspect ratio and an on screen home button.


Samsung's next Galaxy phone may have a 4K screen designed for VR

Mashable

A smartphone with 4K display sounds like overkill for daily use, but for use with VR, it would mean sharper virtual worlds with fewer visible pixels. Where do we sign up? Samsung showed off a new 5.5-inch 4K resolution smartphone designed for VR at the Display Week conference in San Francisco reports UploadVR. The "high resolution for VR" screen has a resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 with an 806 ppi. SEE ALSO: Wearable'backpack PCs' let you experience high-end VR on the go Samsung's current flagship phones -- the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge -- only have Quad HD resolution (2,560 x 1,440).


Dancing galaxies may shake up our ideas of galaxy formation

New Scientist

The dwarf galaxies orbiting the much larger galaxy Centaurus A appear to be moving along the same plane as one another. If this surprisingly coordinated dance around a galactic hub is common across the cosmos, we may have to go back to the drawing board on galaxy formation theory. But that's a big, big if. Theories on galaxy formation suggest that dwarf galaxies should be captured by larger galaxies into random orbits based on the direction they came from. In this view, …


Dancing galaxies may shake up our ideas of galaxy formation

New Scientist

The dwarf galaxies orbiting the much larger galaxy Centaurus A appear to be moving along the same plane as one another. If this surprisingly coordinated dance around a galactic hub is common across the cosmos, we may have to go back to the drawing board on galaxy formation theory. Theories on galaxy formation suggest that dwarf galaxies should be captured by larger galaxies into random orbits based on the direction they came from.


Dancing galaxies may shake up our ideas of galaxy formation

New Scientist

The dwarf galaxies orbiting the much larger galaxy Centaurus A appear to be moving along the same plane as one another. If this surprisingly coordinated dance around a galactic hub is common across the cosmos, we may have to go back to the drawing board on galaxy formation theory. Theories on galaxy formation suggest that dwarf galaxies should be captured by larger galaxies into random orbits based on the direction they came from. In this view, large galaxies are like hoarders, snatching up satellite galaxies and tossing them wherever. In Centaurus A, however, it is more like a collector has neatly put them in a row on a shelf.