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Non-monotone Submodular Maximization in Exponentially Fewer Iterations

Neural Information Processing Systems

In this paper we consider parallelization for applications whose objective can be expressed as maximizing a non-monotone submodular function under a cardinality constraint. Our main result is an algorithm whose approximation is arbitrarily close to 1/2e in O(log^2 n) adaptive rounds, where n is the size of the ground set. This is an exponential speedup in parallel running time over any previously studied algorithm for constrained non-monotone submodular maximization. Beyond its provable guarantees, the algorithm performs well in practice. Specifically, experiments on traffic monitoring and personalized data summarization applications show that the algorithm finds solutions whose values are competitive with state-of-the-art algorithms while running in exponentially fewer parallel iterations.


An Optimal Algorithm for Online Unconstrained Submodular Maximization

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We consider a basic problem at the interface of two fundamental fields: submodular optimization and online learning. In the online unconstrained submodular maximization (online USM) problem, there is a universe $[n]=\{1,2,...,n\}$ and a sequence of $T$ nonnegative (not necessarily monotone) submodular functions arrive over time. The goal is to design a computationally efficient online algorithm, which chooses a subset of $[n]$ at each time step as a function only of the past, such that the accumulated value of the chosen subsets is as close as possible to the maximum total value of a fixed subset in hindsight. Our main result is a polynomial-time no-$1/2$-regret algorithm for this problem, meaning that for every sequence of nonnegative submodular functions, the algorithm's expected total value is at least $1/2$ times that of the best subset in hindsight, up to an error term sublinear in $T$. The factor of $1/2$ cannot be improved upon by any polynomial-time online algorithm when the submodular functions are presented as value oracles. Previous work on the offline problem implies that picking a subset uniformly at random in each time step achieves zero $1/4$-regret. A byproduct of our techniques is an explicit subroutine for the two-experts problem that has an unusually strong regret guarantee: the total value of its choices is comparable to twice the total value of either expert on rounds it did not pick that expert. This subroutine may be of independent interest.


Adaptive Submodular Maximization in Bandit Setting

Neural Information Processing Systems

Maximization of submodular functions has wide applications in machine learning and artificial intelligence. Adaptive submodular maximization has been traditionally studied under the assumption that the model of the world, the expected gain of choosing an item given previously selected items and their states, is known. In this paper, we study the scenario where the expected gain is initially unknown and it is learned by interacting repeatedly with the optimized function. We propose an efficient algorithm for solving our problem and prove that its expected cumulative regret increases logarithmically with time. Our regret bound captures the inherent property of submodular maximization, earlier mistakes are more costly than later ones. We refer to our approach as Optimistic Adaptive Submodular Maximization (OASM) because it trades off exploration and exploitation based on the optimism in the face of uncertainty principle. We evaluate our method on a preference elicitation problem and show that non-trivial K-step policies can be learned from just a few hundred interactions with the problem.


Non-Monotone Adaptive Submodular Maximization

AAAI Conferences

A wide range of AI problems, such as sensor placement, active learning, and network influence maximization, require sequentially selecting elements from a large set with the goal of optimizing the utility of the selected subset. Moreover, each element that is picked may provide stochastic feedback, which can be used to make smarter decisions about future selections. Finding efficient policies for this general class of adaptive optimization problems can be extremely hard. However, when the objective function is adaptive monotone and adaptive submodular, a simple greedy policy attains a 1-1/e approximation ratio in terms of expected utility. Unfortunately, many practical objective functions are naturally non-monotone; to our knowledge, no existing policy has provable performance guarantees when the assumption of adaptive monotonicity is lifted. We propose the adaptive random greedy policy for maximizing adaptive submodular functions, and prove that it retains the aforementioned 1-1/e approximation ratio for functions that are also adaptive monotone, while it additionally provides a 1/e approximation ratio for non-monotone adaptive submodular functions. We showcase the benefits of adaptivity on three real-world network data sets using two non-monotone functions, representative of two classes of commonly encountered non-monotone objectives.


Adaptive Submodular Maximization in Bandit Setting

Neural Information Processing Systems

Maximization of submodular functions has wide applications in machine learning and artificial intelligence. Adaptive submodular maximization has been traditionally studied under the assumption that the model of the world, the expected gain of choosing an item given previously selected items and their states, is known. In this paper, we study the scenario where the expected gain is initially unknown and it is learned by interacting repeatedly with the optimized function. We propose an efficient algorithm for solving our problem and prove that its expected cumulative regret increases logarithmically with time. Our regret bound captures the inherent property of submodular maximization, earlier mistakes are more costly than later ones.