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Smart Building Sensors for Schools and Vaping Detection, Too

#artificialintelligence

Digital transformation applies not just to the enterprise sector, but also to the realm of education, where schools are increasingly equipped with high-speed networking supporting IoT applications and digital learning is becoming the rule. "We're seeing lots of school districts moving their curriculum up for maybe 10 to 15% digital to roughly 50% digital within the next two to three years," said Rich Nedwich, director of education global marketing at Ruckus Wireless, which recently launched its R750 Wi-Fi 6 access point and ICX 7150-C10ZP switch address to help lay the groundwork for digital learning. Most districts plan to ultimately make all of their curriculum digital at some point, "but most probably don't know when just yet," Nedwich said. To make this transformation possible requires a reboot in infrastructure, which can be used to support a myriad of applications such as IP-connected school bells, locks, HVAC systems, surveillance cameras, and sensors in and around the school. Schools' IoT infrastructure can also be used to combat bullying and the vaping epidemic.


Do L.A. Unified's daily random searches keep students safe, or do they go too far?

Los Angeles Times

L.A. Unified requires daily random searches for weapons using metal-detector wands at all of its middle and high school campuses, including Hamilton High. L.A. Unified requires daily random searches for weapons using metal-detector wands at all of its middle and high school campuses, including Hamilton High. Kevin Castillo was in his freshman year at Hamilton High School when administrators carrying hand-held metal detectors interrupted his English class to conduct a random search. They asked a student to pick a number between 1 and 10. The student chose 7, so every seventh person in the class had to gather up belongings and step out of the classroom.


Boy Held After Apparent School Shooting Joke Involving Siri

U.S. News

Authorities say a 13-year-old northwestern Indiana boy is charged with intimidation after telling Apple's digital assistant Siri he planned a school shooting and posting an iPhone screenshot of the response on social media as an apparent joke.


Munich shootings: Police arrest 16-year-old Afghan

BBC News

Police in Munich say they have arrested a 16-year-old Afghan friend of David Ali Sonboly, who killed nine people at a Munich shopping centre on Friday. They say the teenager is under investigation for failing to report the attacker's plans, and that he could have been an accomplice. Sonboly, 18, had been planning his attack for a year, police said earlier. They say he had a Glock pistol which he may have bought on the so-called dark net. A statement on Munich police's Facebook page says: "There is a suspicion that the 16-year-old is a possible tacit accomplice to the attack."