Moments and Root-Mean-Square Error of the Bayesian MMSE Estimator of Classification Error in the Gaussian Model

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The most important aspect of any classifier is its error rate, because this quantifies its predictive capacity. Thus, the accuracy of error estimation is critical. Error estimation is problematic in small-sample classifier design because the error must be estimated using the same data from which the classifier has been designed. Use of prior knowledge, in the form of a prior distribution on an uncertainty class of feature-label distributions to which the true, but unknown, feature-distribution belongs, can facilitate accurate error estimation (in the mean-square sense) in circumstances where accurate completely model-free error estimation is impossible. This paper provides analytic asymptotically exact finite-sample approximations for various performance metrics of the resulting Bayesian Minimum Mean-Square-Error (MMSE) error estimator in the case of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) in the multivariate Gaussian model. These performance metrics include the first, second, and cross moments of the Bayesian MMSE error estimator with the true error of LDA, and therefore, the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) error of the estimator. We lay down the theoretical groundwork for Kolmogorov double-asymptotics in a Bayesian setting, which enables us to derive asymptotic expressions of the desired performance metrics. From these we produce analytic finite-sample approximations and demonstrate their accuracy via numerical examples. Various examples illustrate the behavior of these approximations and their use in determining the necessary sample size to achieve a desired RMS. The Supplementary Material contains derivations for some equations and added figures.


Detecting Adversarial Samples from Artifacts

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Deep neural networks (DNNs) are powerful nonlinear architectures that are known to be robust to random perturbations of the input. However, these models are vulnerable to adversarial perturbations--small input changes crafted explicitly to fool the model. In this paper, we ask whether a DNN can distinguish adversarial samples from their normal and noisy counterparts. We investigate model confidence on adversarial samples by looking at Bayesian uncertainty estimates, available in dropout neural networks, and by performing density estimation in the subspace of deep features learned by the model. The result is a method for implicit adversarial detection that is oblivious to the attack algorithm. We evaluate this method on a variety of standard datasets including MNIST and CIFAR-10 and show that it generalizes well across different architectures and attacks. Our findings report that 85-93% ROC-AUC can be achieved on a number of standard classification tasks with a negative class that consists of both normal and noisy samples.


Asymptotic slowing down of the nearest-neighbor classifier

Neural Information Processing Systems

Santosh S. Venkatesh Electrical Engineering University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA 19104 If patterns are drawn from an n-dimensional feature space according to a probability distribution that obeys a weak smoothness criterion, we show that the probability that a random input pattern is misclassified by a nearest-neighbor classifier using M random reference patterns asymptotically satisfies a PM(error) "" Poo(error) M2/n' for sufficiently large values of M. Here, Poo(error) denotes the probability of error in the infinite sample limit, and is at most twice the error of a Bayes classifier. Although the value of the coefficient a depends upon the underlying probability distributions, the exponent of M is largely distribution free.We thus obtain a concise relation between a classifier's ability to generalize from a finite reference sample and the dimensionality of the feature space, as well as an analytic validation of Bellman's well known "curse of dimensionality." 1 INTRODUCTION One of the primary tasks assigned to neural networks is pattern classification.


Sample Size Planning for Classification Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In biospectroscopy, suitably annotated and statistically independent samples (e. g. patients, batches, etc.) for classifier training and testing are scarce and costly. Learning curves show the model performance as function of the training sample size and can help to determine the sample size needed to train good classifiers. However, building a good model is actually not enough: the performance must also be proven. We discuss learning curves for typical small sample size situations with 5 - 25 independent samples per class. Although the classification models achieve acceptable performance, the learning curve can be completely masked by the random testing uncertainty due to the equally limited test sample size. In consequence, we determine test sample sizes necessary to achieve reasonable precision in the validation and find that 75 - 100 samples will usually be needed to test a good but not perfect classifier. Such a data set will then allow refined sample size planning on the basis of the achieved performance. We also demonstrate how to calculate necessary sample sizes in order to show the superiority of one classifier over another: this often requires hundreds of statistically independent test samples or is even theoretically impossible. We demonstrate our findings with a data set of ca. 2550 Raman spectra of single cells (five classes: erythrocytes, leukocytes and three tumour cell lines BT-20, MCF-7 and OCI-AML3) as well as by an extensive simulation that allows precise determination of the actual performance of the models in question.


Local Probabilistic Model for Bayesian Classification: a Generalized Local Classification Model

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In Bayesian classification, it is important to establish a probabilistic model for each class for likelihood estimation. Most of the previous methods modeled the probability distribution in the whole sample space. However, real-world problems are usually too complex to model in the whole sample space; some fundamental assumptions are required to simplify the global model, for example, the class conditional independence assumption for naive Bayesian classification. In this paper, with the insight that the distribution in a local sample space should be simpler than that in the whole sample space, a local probabilistic model established for a local region is expected much simpler and can relax the fundamental assumptions that may not be true in the whole sample space. Based on these advantages we propose establishing local probabilistic models for Bayesian classification. In addition, a Bayesian classifier adopting a local probabilistic model can even be viewed as a generalized local classification model; by tuning the size of the local region and the corresponding local model assumption, a fitting model can be established for a particular classification problem. The experimental results on several real-world datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of local probabilistic models for Bayesian classification.