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TextNAS: A Neural Architecture Search Space tailored for Text Representation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Learning text representation is crucial for text classification and other language related tasks. There are a diverse set of text representation networks in the literature, and how to find the optimal one is a non-trivial problem. Recently, the emerging Neural Architecture Search (NAS) techniques have demonstrated good potential to solve the problem. Nevertheless, most of the existing works of NAS focus on the search algorithms and pay little attention to the search space. In this paper, we argue that the search space is also an important human prior to the success of NAS in different applications. Thus, we propose a novel search space tailored for text representation. Through automatic search, the discovered network architecture outperforms state-of-the-art models on various public datasets on text classification and natural language inference tasks. Furthermore, some of the design principles found in the automatic network agree well with human intuition.


An Introduction to Neural Architecture Search for Convolutional Networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Neural Architecture Search (NAS) is a research field concerned with utilizing optimization algorithms to design optimal neural network architectures. There are many approaches concerning the architectural search spaces, optimization algorithms, as well as candidate architecture evaluation methods. As the field is growing at a continuously increasing pace, it is difficult for a beginner to discern between major, as well as emerging directions the field has followed. In this work, we provide an introduction to the basic concepts of NAS for convolutional networks, along with the major advances in search spaces, algorithms and evaluation techniques.


Neural Architecture Search

#artificialintelligence

Neural Architecture Search (NAS) automates network architecture engineering. It aims to learn a network topology that can achieve best performance on a certain task. Although most popular and successful model architectures are designed by human experts, it doesn't mean we have explored the entire network architecture space and settled down with the best option. We would have a better chance to find the optimal solution if we adopt a systematic and automatic way of learning high-performance model architectures. Automatically learning and evolving network topologies is not a new idea (Stanley & Miikkulainen, 2002). In recent years, the pioneering work by Zoph & Le 2017 and Baker et al. 2017 has attracted a lot of attention into the field of Neural Architecture Search (NAS), leading to many interesting ideas for better, faster and more cost-efficient NAS methods. As I started looking into NAS, I found this nice survey very helpful by Elsken, et al 2019. They characterize NAS as a system with three major components, which is clean & concise, and also commonly adopted in other NAS papers. The NAS search space defines a set of basic network operations and how operations can be connected to construct valid network architectures.


Efficient Neural Architecture Search via Parameter Sharing

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We propose Efficient Neural Architecture Search (ENAS), a fast and inexpensive approach for automatic model design. In ENAS, a controller learns to discover neural network architectures by searching for an optimal subgraph within a large computational graph. The controller is trained with policy gradient to select a subgraph that maximizes the expected reward on the validation set. Meanwhile the model corresponding to the selected subgraph is trained to minimize a canonical cross entropy loss. Thanks to parameter sharing between child models, ENAS is fast: it delivers strong empirical performances using much fewer GPU-hours than all existing automatic model design approaches, and notably, 1000x less expensive than standard Neural Architecture Search. On the Penn Treebank dataset, ENAS discovers a novel architecture that achieves a test perplexity of 55.8, establishing a new state-of-the-art among all methods without post-training processing. On the CIFAR-10 dataset, ENAS designs novel architectures that achieve a test error of 2.89%, which is on par with NASNet (Zoph et al., 2018), whose test error is 2.65%.


Path-Level Network Transformation for Efficient Architecture Search

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We introduce a new function-preserving transformation for efficient neural architecture search. This network transformation allows reusing previously trained networks and existing successful architectures that improves sample efficiency. We aim to address the limitation of current network transformation operations that can only perform layer-level architecture modifications, such as adding (pruning) filters or inserting (removing) a layer, which fails to change the topology of connection paths. Our proposed path-level transformation operations enable the meta-controller to modify the path topology of the given network while keeping the merits of reusing weights, and thus allow efficiently designing effective structures with complex path topologies like Inception models. We further propose a bidirectional tree-structured reinforcement learning meta-controller to explore a simple yet highly expressive tree-structured architecture space that can be viewed as a generalization of multi-branch architectures. We experimented on the image classification datasets with limited computational resources (about 200 GPU-hours), where we observed improved parameter efficiency and better test results (97.70% test accuracy on CIFAR-10 with 14.3M parameters and 74.6% top-1 accuracy on ImageNet in the mobile setting), demonstrating the effectiveness and transferability of our designed architectures.