[Report] Submillisecond organic synthesis: Outpacing Fries rearrangement through microfluidic rapid mixing

Science

Chemistry relies on encounters between reactive partners. Sometimes one of the partners changes shape during the wait, spoiling the desired outcome. Kim et al. designed a microfluidic device to keep such botched encounters from happening. The device operates at low temperatures to keep individual reactants from isomerizing. It also achieves fast flow rates to maximize encounters between reactants on a microsecond time scale.


Genome Rearrangement and Planning: Revisited

AAAI Conferences

Evolutionary trees of species can be reconstructed by pairwise comparison of their entire genomes. Such a comparison can be quantified by determining the number of events that change the order of genes in a genome. Earlier Erdem and Tillier formulated the pairwise comparison of entire genomes as the problem of planning rearrangement events that transform one genome to the other. We reformulate this problem as a planning problem to extend its applicability to genomes with multiple copies of genes and with unequal gene content, and illustrate its applicability and effectiveness on three real datasets: mitochondrial genomes of Metazoa, chloroplast genomes of Campanulaceae, chloroplast genomes of various land plants and green algae.


Genome Rearrangement: A Planning Approach

AAAI Conferences

Evolutionary trees of species can be reconstructed by pairwise comparison of their entire genomes. Such a comparison can be quantified by determining the number of events that change the order of genes in a genome. Earlier Erdem and Tillier formulated the pairwise comparison of entire genomes as the problem of planning rearrangement events that transform one genome to the other. We reformulate this problem as a planning problem to extend its applicability to genomes with multiple copies of genes and with unequal gene content, and illustrate its applicability and effectiveness on three real datasets: mitochondrial genomes of Metazoa, chloroplast genomes of Campanulaceae, chloroplast genomes of various land plants and green algae.


Genome Rearrangement and Planning

AAAI Conferences

The genome rearrangement problem is to find the most economical explanation for observed differences between the gene orders of two genomes. Such an explanation is provided in terms of events that change the order of genes in a genome. We present a new approach to the genome rearrangement problem, according to which this problem is viewed as the problem of planning rearrangement events that transform one genome to the other. This method differs from the existing ones in that we can put restrictions on the number of events, specify the cost of events with functions, possibly based on the length of the gene fragment involved, and add constraints controlling search.


A Surprising New Rearrangement Of The Dinosaur Family Tree

Forbes - Tech

This result has implications for the very origin of dinosaurs--it was typically thought the earliest dinosaurs sprung up in the southern part of the world, but perhaps they could have arose in the north. It places the origin of dinosaurs approximately 247 million years ago, which is slightly earlier than previously posited. But like any new idea put forth, this one will be further scrutinized and has already been met with a healthy degree of skepticism in the paleontology community. Going against the flow is hard. One new study does not necessarily indicate a paradigm shift, but it can happen if these results are verified by other research groups.