A Health App's AI Took on Human Doctors to Triage Patients

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Two decades on from artificial intelligence beating chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov, AI is proving it can do some conventionally human jobs. One UK-based health app now hopes its AI can take over some tasks that would usually only be trusted to a doctor or nurse. In a swish new office in London's Chelsea on Tuesday, health technology firm Babylon pitted its app against a junior doctor and a nurse with 20 years of accident and emergency experience. The machine and the medical professionals were tasked with deciding the priority of treatment for an ailment, a process known in the medical profession as triage. Irwin Nazareth, professor of primary care and population sciences at UCL and a committee chairman at Health Education England, moderated the challenge and ruled the artificial intelligence was as accurate as the nurse and doctor in its assessments.


Babylon Health has raised £50 million for AI diagnosis tool

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Digital healthcare company, Babylon Health, have raised about £50 million to further develop its artificial intelligence clinical diagnosis capabilities. Babylon says the new AI tool will help clinicians by providing them with a diagnosis of more routine conditions. Planned capabilities include using natural language processing to take notes in patient consultations. Speaking to Digital Health News, Ali Parsa, founder and chief executive of Babylon, claimed the new diagnosis tool could potentially cut the cost of a consultation by 80%. He said the latest £50m raised by Babylon that the money will go towards "engineering and mass producing the technology" for a new AI tool that will help clinicians by providing diagnosis of more routine conditions.


The NHS is working with Babylon to build an AI-powered helpline

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In November last year The Memo revealed Babylon's plans to move from AI-powered triage towards diagnosis and eventually to AI-powered prescriptions. "[AI-powered triage is] something that a few years ago people would have said was impossible to get a machine to do, now we're doing it with thousands of patients every single day," said CEO and founder, Dr Ali Parsa. "In two or three years, realistically I can't see how a human being can diagnose better than a machine." For the new NHS app that already seems like it might be the case, the health service claims someone can get advice from the app 12 times faster than a phone call to 111. After answering a few questions the app filters through thousands of possibilities, searching through the symptoms of every known illness, to give you advice on which over-the-counter medication might help or whether you should visit your GP.


First artificial intelligence' medic will be pitted against doctor

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The world's first'artificial intelligence' triage nurse will be pitted against the real thing this week, in a head-to-head contest that could mark a turning point in medicine. British start-up firm Babylon Health will test its programme, called Check, against a doctor and nurse in a competition to see which can deal most quickly and accurately with a range of common health problems. The smartphone app has been designed to act like a triage nurse, asking a series of questions to advise users whether their problem is nothing to worry about, something they should consult their GP about, or a matter that requires calling 999. Its developers, who believe AI will transform medicine in the coming years, said last night they were'very confident' their app would come out on top. Babylon Health boss Ali Parsa said Check could analyse thousands of problems with astounding precision.


First artificial intelligence' medic will be pitted against doctor

#artificialintelligence

The world's first'artificial intelligence' doctor will be pitted against the real thing this week, in a head-to-head contest that could mark a turning point in medicine. British start-up firm Babylon Health will test its programme, called Check, against a doctor and nurse in a competition to see which can deal most quickly and accurately with a range of common health problems. The smartphone app has been designed to act like a triage nurse, asking a series of questions to advise users whether their problem is nothing to worry about, something they should consult their GP about, or a matter that requires calling 999. Its developers, who believe AI will transform medicine in the coming years, said last night they were '100 per cent confident' their app would come out on top. Babylon Health boss Ali Parsa said Check could analyse thousands of problems with astounding precision.