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Moving machine learning from practice to production

#artificialintelligence

With growing interest in neural networks and deep learning, individuals and companies are claiming ever-increasing adoption rates of artificial intelligence into their daily workflows and product offerings. Coupled with breakneck speeds in AI-research, the new wave of popularity shows a lot of promise for solving some of the harder problems out there. That said, I feel that this field suffers from a gulf between appreciating these developments and subsequently deploying them to solve "real-world" tasks. A number of frameworks, tutorials and guides have popped up to democratize machine learning, but the steps that they prescribe often don't align with the fuzzier problems that need to be solved. This post is a collection of questions (with some (maybe even incorrect) answers) that are worth thinking about when applying machine learning in production.


Deep Spatio-Temporal Architectures and Learning for Protein Structure Prediction

Neural Information Processing Systems

Residue-residue contact prediction is a fundamental problem in protein structure prediction. Hower, despite considerable research efforts, contact prediction methods are still largely unreliable. Here we introduce a novel deep machine-learning architecture which consists of a multidimensional stack of learning modules. For contact prediction, the idea is implemented as a three-dimensional stack of Neural Networks NN k_{ij}, where i and j index the spatial coordinates of the contact map and k indexes ''time''. The temporal dimension is introduced to capture the fact that protein folding is not an instantaneous process, but rather a progressive refinement.


Mean teachers are better role models: Weight-averaged consistency targets improve semi-supervised deep learning results

Neural Information Processing Systems

The recently proposed Temporal Ensembling has achieved state-of-the-art results in several semi-supervised learning benchmarks. It maintains an exponential moving average of label predictions on each training example, and penalizes predictions that are inconsistent with this target. However, because the targets change only once per epoch, Temporal Ensembling becomes unwieldy when learning large datasets. To overcome this problem, we propose Mean Teacher, a method that averages model weights instead of label predictions. As an additional benefit, Mean Teacher improves test accuracy and enables training with fewer labels than Temporal Ensembling.


Questions To Ask When Moving Machine Learning From Practice to Production

#artificialintelligence

With growing interest in neural networks and deep learning, individuals and companies are claiming ever-increasing adoption rates of artificial intelligence into their daily workflows and product offerings. Coupled with breakneck speeds in AI-research, the new wave of popularity shows a lot of promise for solving some of the harder problems out there. That said, I feel that this field suffers from a gulf between appreciating these developments and subsequently deploying them to solve "real-world" tasks. A number of frameworks, tutorials and guides have popped up to democratize machine learning, but the steps that they prescribe often don't align with the fuzzier problems that need to be solved. This post is a collection of questions (with some (maybe even incorrect) answers) that are worth thinking about when applying machine learning in production.


Questions To Ask When Moving Machine Learning From Practice to Production

#artificialintelligence

With growing interest in neural networks and deep learning, individuals and companies are claiming ever-increasing adoption rates of artificial intelligence into their daily workflows and product offerings. Coupled with breakneck speeds in AI-research, the new wave of popularity shows a lot of promise for solving some of the harder problems out there. That said, I feel that this field suffers from a gulf between appreciating these developments and subsequently deploying them to solve "real-world" tasks. A number of frameworks, tutorials and guides have popped up to democratize machine learning, but the steps that they prescribe often don't align with the fuzzier problems that need to be solved. This post is a collection of questions (with some (maybe even incorrect) answers) that are worth thinking about when applying machine learning in production.