Goto

Collaborating Authors

MusicVAE: Creating a palette for musical scores with machine learning.

#artificialintelligence

When a painter creates a work of art, she first blends and explores color options on an artist's palette before applying them to the canvas. This process is a creative act in its own right and has a profound effect on the final work. Musicians and composers have mostly lacked a similar device for exploring and mixing musical ideas, but we are hoping to change that. Below we introduce MusicVAE, a machine learning model that lets us create palettes for blending and exploring musical scores. As an example, listen to this gradual blending of 2 different melodies, A and B. We'll explain how this morph was achieved throughout the post.


Learning a Latent Space of Multitrack Measures

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Discovering and exploring the underlying structure of multi-instrumental music using learning-based approaches remains an open problem. We extend the recent MusicVAE model to represent multitrack polyphonic measures as vectors in a latent space. Our approach enables several useful operations such as generating plausible measures from scratch, interpolating between measures in a musically meaningful way, and manipulating specific musical attributes. We also introduce chord conditioning, which allows all of these operations to be performed while keeping harmony fixed, and allows chords to be changed while maintaining musical "style". By generating a sequence of measures over a predefined chord progression, our model can produce music with convincing long-term structure. We demonstrate that our latent space model makes it possible to intuitively control and generate musical sequences with rich instrumentation (see https://goo.gl/s2N7dV for generated audio).


Learning to Traverse Latent Spaces for Musical Score Inpainting

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Music Inpainting is the task of filling in missing or lost information in a piece of music. We investigate this task from an interactive music creation perspective. To this end, a novel deep learning-based approach for musical score inpainting is proposed. The designed model takes both past and future musical context into account and is capable of suggesting ways to connect them in a musically meaningful manner. To achieve this, we leverage the representational power of the latent space of a Variational Auto-Encoder and train a Recurrent Neural Network which learns to traverse this latent space conditioned on the past and future musical contexts. Consequently, the designed model is capable of generating several measures of music to connect two musical excerpts. The capabilities and performance of the model are showcased by comparison with competitive baselines using several objective and subjective evaluation methods. The results show that the model generates meaningful inpaintings and can be used in interactive music creation applications. Overall, the method demonstrates the merit of learning complex trajectories in the latent spaces of deep generative models.


Learning a Latent Space of Style-Aware Symbolic Music Representations by Adversarial Autoencoders

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We address the challenging open problem of learning an effective latent space for symbolic music data in generative music modeling. We focus on leveraging adversarial regularization as a flexible and natural mean to imbue variational autoencoders with context information concerning music genre and style. Through the paper, we show how Gaussian mixtures taking into account music metadata information can be used as an effective prior for the autoencoder latent space, introducing the first Music Adversarial Autoencoder (MusAE). The empirical analysis on a large scale benchmark shows that our model has a higher reconstruction accuracy than state-of-the-art models based on standard variational autoencoders. It is also able to create realistic interpolations between two musical sequences, smoothly changing the dynamics of the different tracks. Experiments show that the model can organise its latent space accordingly to low-level properties of the musical pieces, as well as to embed into the latent variables the high-level genre information injected from the prior distribution to increase its overall performance. This allows us to perform changes to the generated pieces in a principled way.


Encoding Musical Style with Transformer Autoencoders

arXiv.org Machine Learning

A BSTRACT We consider the problem of learning high-level controls over the global structure of sequence generation, particularly in the context of symbolic music generation with complex language models. In this work, we present the Transformer au-toencoder, which aggregates encodings of the input data across time to obtain a global representation of style from a given performance. We show it is possible to combine this global embedding with other temporally distributed embeddings, enabling improved control over the separate aspects of performance style and and melody. Empirically, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on a variety of music generation tasks on the MAESTRO dataset and a Y ouTube dataset with 10,000 hours of piano performances, where we achieve improvements in terms of log-likelihood and mean listening scores as compared to relevant baselines. As the number of generative applications increase, it becomes increasingly important to consider how users can interact with such systems, particularly when the generative model functions as a tool in their creative process (Engel et al., 2017a; Gillick et al., 2019) To this end, we consider how one can learn high-level controls over the global structure of a generated sample. We focus on symbolic music generation, where Music Transformer (Huang et al., 2019b) is the current state-of-the-art in generating high-quality samples that span over a minute in length. The challenge in controllable sequence generation is that Transformers (V aswani et al., 2017) and their variants excel as language models or in sequence-to-sequence tasks such as translation, but it is less clear as to how they can: (1) learn and (2) incorporate global conditioning information at inference time.